AP Lit Free Response Prompts

  1. It has often been said that what we value can be determined only by what we sacrifice. Consider how this statement applies to a character from a novel or play. Select a character that has deliberately sacrificed, surrendered, or forfeited something in a way that highlights that character’s values. Then write a well-organized essay in which you analyze how the particular sacrifice illuminates the character’s values and provides a deeper understanding of the meaning of the work as a whole. You may choose a novel or play from the list below or one of comparable literary merit. Do not merely summarize the plot.(2014)
  2. In The Writing of Fiction (1925), novelist Edith Wharton states the following. At every stage in the progress of his tale the novelist must rely on what may be called the illuminating incident to reveal and emphasize the inner meaning of each situation. Illuminating incidents are the magic casements of fiction, its vistas on infinity. Choose a novel or play that you have studied and write a well-organized essay in which you describe an “illuminating” episode or moment and explain how it functions as a “casement,” a window that opens onto the meaning of the work as a whole. Avoid mere plot summary. You may select a work from the list below or another appropriate novel or play of comparable literary merit.(2011 Form B)
  3. A bildungsroman, or coming-of-age novel, recounts the psychological or moral development of its protagonist from youth to maturity, when this character recognizes his or her place in the world. Select a single pivotal moment in the psychological or moral development of the protagonist of a bildungsroman. Then write a well-organized essay that analyzes how that single moment shapes the meaning of the work as a whole. You may choose a work from the list below or one of comparable literary merit. Do not merely summarize the plot.(2013)
  4. 2015( http://apcentral.collegeboard.com/apc/public/repository/_ap05_frq_englishlit_45549.pdf
  5. 2007
  6. Cognitive Construct of the Self -Janie Crawford
  7. Ebook of Their Eyes Were Watching God with Preface
  8. Letter from Hurston to Countee Cullen

AP Workshop

AP English Literature and AP English Language

Bronx

April 1, 2017

https://sss-4-bronx-english.eventbrite.com

Manhattan

April 22, 2017

https://sss-4-manhattan-english.eventbrite.com

Brooklyn

April 29, 2017

https://sss-4-brooklyn-english.eventbrite.com

AP Environmental Science and AP Biology

Manhattan

April 1, 2017

https://sss-4-manhattan-science.eventbrite.com

Brooklyn

April 22, 2017

https://sss-4-brooklyn-science.eventbrite.com

Bronx

April 29, 2017

https://sss-4-bronx-science.eventbrite.com

AP Calculus, AP Statistics and AP United States History

Brooklyn

April 1, 2017

https://sss-4-brooklyn-mathandus.eventbrite.com

Bronx

April 22, 2017

https://sss-4-bronx-mathandus.eventbrite.com

Manhattan

April 29, 2017

https://sss-4-manhattan-mathandus.eventbrite.com

Poetry Analysis example

Emily Dickinson’s Poem ” Because I could not stop for death”

(Introduction) Death is often portrayed as menacing in many works of literary. In Emily Dickinson’s poem “Because I Could Not Stop for Death”, she provides a different perspective. Through the use of descriptive language, Dickinson portrays death as a nonthreatening and peaceful experience and conveys one must accept death as part of his or her destiny (central idea).

( Body 1) From the very beginning of the poem, Dickinson uses descriptive language to portray death a safe and lonely but dignified experience (claim 1). She begins by introducing “ Death” to her reader as kind and civil as illustrated in “ kindly stopped for me” and” his Civility”. Even though the speaker cannot stop Death from coming, she regards the act of Death as “kind” and dignified because He is taking her in a “carriage”. Dickinson continues to describe death as solemn and dignified as illustrated in the way Death drives, “slowly”, “ no haste” and “ his Civility”( point 1) .On the other hand, the speaker also finds the journey to be lonely since there are only themselves ( she and death) as illustrated in “ the carriage held but just ourselves”. The adverb “just” suggest slight trepidation of taking the ride alone with death himself and remorse that there is no other passage riding with her to accompany her( point 2). The silence and dignity felt by the speaker during the lonely ride with death reveals dying is essentially a dignified life experience and one has to experience it alone.

( Body 2) As Dickinson continue describing the speaker’s journey to death,  she further reveals that death can give a sense of tranquility and peace if one regards it as part of one’s destiny( claim 2) . The speaker, while sitting in the carriage, sees her life pass by her through the descriptions such as “children strove”, “fields of gazing grain” and “the setting sun” suggesting her childhood, maturity and the near end of her life. Dickinson’s portrayal of death as “ gossamer” appearance and the speaker as “ tulle” reveals death is an intangible experience, magical and hard to grasp but soothing since both “ gossamer” and “ tulle” connote translucent, soft and silky. Finally Dickinson portrays the tomb the speaker sees as “a House that seems a swelling of the ground”. To compare tomb to a house, the poet seems to regard death as going home experience- safe, tranquil and peaceful. The speaker’s serenity as she reaches her final destination connotes the idea that death is everyone’s final destiny, thus no surprises and no pain but acceptance.

( Conclusion) Through the use descriptive language, Dickinson reveal death is part of life experiences and there is no need to fear it. Even though no one is going to seek death, death will eventually find everyone, but treat him/her with dignity. Therefore, death is not that strange but should feel like going home- the end of one’s life journey.

 

 

Essay Contest

 ESSAY CONTEST FOR 10th, 11TH AND 12TH GRADE STUDENTS
 
The Association of Justices of the Supreme Court of the State of New York and the New York Law Journal have partnered with the New York City Dept. of Education to sponsor the Sixteenth annual essay contest for 10th, 11th and 12th grade high school students.  Ten students will win the opportunity to intern for one week with a Justice of the Supreme Court and earn a $100.00 gift card.  A maximum of ten entries from each school will be considered. One of the winning essays will be published in the New York Law Journal, a legal periodical published by the ALM.  
                                                                                                                                               
The Law Day theme for 2017, is “The 14th Amendment:  Transforming American Democracy.”
The 2017 theme provides the opportunity to explore the many ways that the Fourteenth Amendment has reshaped American law and society.  Ratified during Reconstruction a century and a half ago, the Fourteenth Amendment serves as the cornerstone of landmark civil rights legislation, the foundation for numerous court decisions protecting fundamental rights, and a  inspiration for all those who advocate for equal justice under law.
 
Students should write a 500 word essay presenting a compelling discussion on the topic with special focus on the importance and impact of the Fourteenth Amendment.
                                               
The following websites may assist your students in their research – other resources may be used.  All sources should be credited.
Law Day Topic  http://www.Lawday.org
General Legal Resources
 1.  New York State Courts Legal Research Portal
2.   Free Online Law Review/Journal Articles
3.   New York Law Journal
            http://www.newyorklawjournal.com
4.   The United States Constitution with Commentary
           
Statutes
1 New York State Consolidated Laws
2.   Law Library of Congress
3.   New York Courts Law Libraries
           
 Case Law 
1.   New York State Court Case Law
2.   Federal Court Case Law

Scholarship Opportunities

Scholarships

An Introduction to Stress and Meter

Fixed Poem Presentation

Objectives: Students will construct a power point presentation to demonstrate their understanding of a particular fixed form of poetry.

Do now: Quick review and prep for the presentation

  1. Elegy
  2. Ballad
  3. free verse
  4. Ode
  5. Rondeau
  6. Sonnet ( Petrachan, Shakespearean, Spencerian and Miltonic)
  7. Terza Rima
  8. Villanelle

Mini Lesson 

Meter Review

  1. Iambic (the noun is iamb or iambus): a lightly stressed syllable followed by a heavily stressed syllable u /
  2.  Trochaic (the noun is trochee): a stressed followed by a light syllable / u
  3.  Anapestic (the noun is anapest): two light syllables followed by a stressed syllable u u /
  4. Dactylic (the noun is dactyl): a stressed syllable followed by two light syllables syllables: / uu
  • If a line has four feet, it is tetrameter.
  • If a line has five feet, it is pentameter.
  • If it has six feet, it is hexameter, and so on.

Presentation Rubric

Presentation Rubric
1 2 3 4 Total
Organization Audience cannot understand presentation because there is no sequence of information. Audience has difficulty following presentation because student jumps around. Student presents information in logical sequence which audience can follow. Student presents information in logical, interesting sequence which audience can follow.
Subject Knowledge Student does not have grasp of information; student cannot answer questions about subject. Student is uncomfortable with information and is able to answer only rudimentary questions. Student is at ease with expected answers to all questions, but fails to elaborate. Student demonstrates full knowledge (more than required) by answering all class questions with explanations and elaboration.
Graphics Student uses superfluous graphics or no graphics Student occasionally uses graphics that rarely support text and presentation. Student’s graphics relate to text and presentation. Student’s graphics explain and reinforce screen text and presentation.
Mechanics Student’s presentation has four or more spelling errors and/or grammatical errors. Presentation has three misspellings and/or grammatical errors. Presentation has no more than two misspellings and/or grammatical errors. Presentation has no misspellings or grammatical errors.
Eye Contact Student reads all of report with no eye contact. Student occasionally uses eye contact, but still reads most of report. Student maintains eye contact most of the time but frequently returns to notes. Student maintains eye contact with audience, seldom returning to notes.
Elocution Student mumbles, incorrectly pronounces terms, and speaks too quietly for students in the back of class to hear. Student’s voice is low. Student incorrectly pronounces terms. Audience members have difficulty hearing presentation. Student’s voice is clear. Student pronounces most words correctly. Most audience members can hear presentation. Student uses a clear voice and correct, precise pronunciation of terms so that all audience members can hear presentation.
Total Points:

Independent Practice

  • Pair presentation and peer critique by using the presentation rubric
  • Take notes while active listening ( there will be a 5-question pop quiz prepared by each pair to test your peer’s knowledge of each fixed form of poem.

Exist Slip: Hand in the critique of your partner’s presentation by completing the rubric.

Homework: Continue working on the AP Packet you received before the spring term started.

_________________________________________

Objectives: Students will be able to apply their understanding of poetry meter and stress to reading poetry.

Resources:

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.11-12.1
Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.

Do Now: 

a. Go over the open-ended essay about the ending of a literary work.

b. Discuss briefly about the sample 9 and 8 essays- what are the signs of strengths?

  • Consider the sound of the underlined word in each passage. Speak the underlined word aloud:  Darth Vader decided to crush the rebel soldier.
  •  Luke Skywalker will rebel against his father’s wishes.

Hear the difference between the way rebel sounds in the first and second sentences? It is spelled the same. So what made the difference in sound?

Teaching Point

  1. To indicate the changes in meter, scholars put a diagonal line ( ´ ) or a macron ( – ) over stressed syllables. A small curving loop ( ˘ ) or a small x ( x ) goes over the unstressed syllables.
  2. Rhyme is only part of poetry. The main component of poetry is its meter (the regular pattern of strong and weak stress). When a poem has a recognizable but varying pattern of stressed and unstressed syllables, the poetry is written in verse.
  3. the basic pattern of each unit is called a foot

Guided Practice

  1. Exercise: Identifying Patterns of Stress Identify the Stress in the Following Words and Phrases: (1) Bill Clinton
  2. (2) Monica Lewinsky
  3. (3) How now brown cow?
  4. (4) Arnold Schwarzenegger
  5. (5) Oops! I did it again! I played with your heart.
  6. (6) Wild thing! You make my heart sing! You make everything . . . groovy.
  7. (7) I went to a party at the county jail. . . . (
  8. 8) Once upon a midnight dreary, while I pondered weak and weary
  9. (9) I shall wear white flannel trousers and walk along the beach I have heard the mermaids singing each to each, I do not think they shall sing to me.
  10. 10) Were there but world enough, and time, this coyness lady, were no crime . . .
  11. (11) Supercallifragilisticexpealadocious!
  12. (12) Perpendicular
  13. (13) Magda is so very mean. She’s an Australopithicene.

Teaching Points PART ii( see page 3)

  1. Iambic (the noun is iamb or iambus): a lightly stressed syllable followed by a heavily stressed syllable u /
  2.  Trochaic (the noun is trochee): a stressed followed by a light syllable / u
  3.  Anapestic (the noun is anapest): two light syllables followed by a stressed syllable u u /
  4. Dactylic (the noun is dactyl): a stressed syllable followed by two light syllables syllables: / uu

Iambs and anapests, since the strong stress is at the end, are called “rising meter“; trochees and dactyls, with the strong stress at the beginning, are called “falling meter.”

Additionally, if a line ends in a standard iamb, with a final stressed syllable, it is said to have a masculine ending.

If an extra lightly stressed syllable is added to a line, it is said to be feminine.

To hear the difference, read the following examples out loud and listen to the final stress:

  • Masculine Ending: u / ‘Twas the night before Christmas, and all through the house, u / Not a creature was stirring, not even a mouse.
  • Feminine Ending: u / u ‘Twas the night before Christmas, and all through the housing, u / u Not a creature was stirring, not even a mousing.

We name metric lines according to the number of “feet” in them.

  • If a line has four feet, it is tetrameter.
  • If a line has five feet, it is pentameter.
  • If it has six feet, it is hexameter, and so on.
  • Different languages tend to require different meter. English verse tends to be pentameter, French verse tetrameter, and Greek verse hexameter. When scanning a line, we might, for instance, describe the line as “iambic pentameter” (having five feet, with each foot tending to be a light syllable followed by heavy syllable). Or it might be “trochaic hexameter” (having six feet, with each foot tending to be a heavy syllable followed by a light syllable)

Independent Practice

BLANK VERSE: IAMBIC PENTAMETER WITH SUBSTITIONS

Now, fair Hippolyta, our nuptial hour

Draws on apace. Four happy days bring in

Another moon; but, O, methinks, how slow

This old moon wanes! She lingers my desires,

Like to a stepdame, or a dowager. . . .

Homework: In pairs, prepare a presentation of a fixed form of poetry. For your presentation, explain what the form looks like ( meter and foot). Select one poem from the HANDOUT to analyze. Practice reading the poem based on the stressed and unstressed syllables. Practice at least 2 stanzas.

  1. Elegy
  2. Ballad
  3. free verse
  4. Ode
  5. Rondeau
  6. Sonnet ( Petrachan, Shakespearean, Spencerian and Miltonic)
  7. Terza Rima
  8. Villanelle