Socratic Seminar on “Birthday Party”

Socratic Seminar Agenda

( 5 minutes) Do Now:

Socratic Seminar norming: turn and talk about the following ( S1-2)

  • Review Socratic Seminar Group Guidelines
  • Dialogue versus debate

( 5 minutes) Mini lesson:

  • Review the Socratic Seminar rules, goal and protocol ( S3)
  • Marking the text (S4-5)
  • Developing Opening, Core, and Closing Questions (S6)

Guided Practice
( 8 minutes) Becoming familiar with the text

  • Read the short story
  • Mark the text
  • Develop three types of questions using Questions Planning Template

(20 minutes) Teacher facilitates Socratic Seminar in a Fish Bowl activity

    • Students count 1 & 2
    • #1 will be inner circle and # 2 will be the outer circle
    • #1 and #2 will be partners and use the Inner-Outer Discussion Circle to evaluate each other( S8)
    • Round 1( 10 minutes)
      • # Opening question discussion ( 2 minutes)
      • Core questions discussion ( 4 minutes)
      • Closing questions discussion ( 4 minutes)
    • Round 2( 10 minutes)
      • # Opening question discussion ( 2 minutes)
      • Core questions discussion (4 minutes)
      • Closing questions discussion ( 4 minutes

Student Independent Practice (7 minutes)

After the Socratic Seminar, students will-

  1. Complete Socratic Seminar Discussion Debrief ( S9)
  2. Complete the Socratic Seminar Self-Assessment Participant( S10)
  3. Evaluate your Socratic Participation (S11)

Exist Slip: Hand in the Socratic Seminar packet

_______

Objectives: Students will be able to engage in discussions about a short story “ Birthday Party” in a Socratic Seminar and reflect on the activity in writing.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.11-12.1
Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text,

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.11-12.2
Determine two or more themes or central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.11-12.4
Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings;

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.11-12.1.C
Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that probe reasoning and evidence; ensure a hearing for a full range of positions on a topic or issue; clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions; and promote divergent and creative perspectives.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.11-12.3
Evaluate a speaker’s point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric, assessing the stance, premises, links among ideas, word choice, points of emphasis, and tone used.

Do Now:

Socratic Seminar norming: turn and talk about the following( S1-2)

  • Review Socratic Seminar Group Guidelines
  • Dialogue versus debate

Mini lesson:

  • Review the Socratic Seminar rules, goal and protocol( S3)
  • Marking the text (S4-5)
  • Developing Opening, Core, and Closing Questions (S6)

Guided Practice

  • Read the short story
  • Mark the text
  • Develop three types of questions using Questions Planning Template
  • Teacher facilitates Socratic Seminar in a Fish Bowl activity
    • Students count 1 & 2
    • #1 will be inner circle and # 2 will be the outer circle
    • #1 and #2 will be partners and use the Inner-Outer Discussion Circle to evaluate each other( S8)
    • Round 1
      • # Opening question discussion ( 2 minutes)
      • Core questions discussion ( 5 minutes)
      • Closing questions discussion ( 5 minutes)
    • Round 2
      • # Opening question discussion ( 2 minutes)
      • Core questions discussion ( 5 minutes)
      • Closing questions discussion ( 5 minutes

Student Independent Practice

After the Socratic Seminar, students will-

  1. Complete Socratic Seminar Discussion Debrief ( S9)
  2. Complete the Socratic Seminar Self-Assessment Participant( S10)
  3. Evaluate your Socratic Participation (S11)

Exist Slip: Hand in the Socratic Seminar packet

 

 

Frankenstein Prose Analysis

More Open-Ended Essay Prompts for which you can use Frankenstein as the literary work

Read and discuss the article “From Creator to Creature: Mirroring in Frankenstein”. select one argument of the author’s you strongly agree, on e you disagree and one you are not sure.

We’ll share in our groups.

____________________________

Read chapter 10 and compare and contrast this scene with the first time when Robert Walton sees the Creature . Pay particular attention to the weather, the appearance of the Creature and his effect on those who see him.

________________________________

Find at least 2-3 quotations from each chapter that respond to your thematic question using dialectical journal form. We’ll use them for class discussions.

AP Literature and Composition Timed Prose Essay

Prompt:

Read the following passage from Frankenstein by Mary Shelley and, in a well-organized essay explain how the author uses literary devices such as diction, imagery, syntax and tone to create a pervasive atmosphere of horror in the passage.

It was on a dreary night of November that I beheld the accomplishment of my toils. With an anxiety that almost amounted to agony, I collected the instruments of life around me, that I might infuse a spark of being into the lifeless thing that lay at my feet. It was already one in the morning; the rain pattered dismally against the panes, and my candle was nearly burnt out, when, by the glimmer of the half-extinguished light, I saw the dull yellow eye of the creature open; it breathed hard, and a convulsive motion agitated its limbs.

How can I describe my emotions at this catastrophe, or how delineate the wretch whom with such infinite pains and care I had endeavoured to form? His limbs were in proportion, and I had selected his features as beautiful. Beautiful! Great God! His yellow skin scarcely covered the work of muscles and arteries beneath; his hair was of a lustrous black, and flowing; his teeth of a pearly whiteness; but these luxuriances only formed a more horrid contrast with his watery eyes, that seemed almost of the same colour as the dun-white sockets in which they were set, his shrivelled complexion and straight black lips.

The different accidents of life are not so changeable as the feelings of human nature. I had worked hard for nearly two years, for the sole purpose of infusing life into an inanimate body. For this I had deprived myself of rest and health. I had desired it with an ardour that far exceeded moderation; but now that I had finished, the beauty of the dream vanished, and breathless horror and disgust filled my heart. Unable to endure the aspect of the being I had created, I rushed out of the room and continued a long time traversing my bed-chamber, unable to compose my mind to sleep. At length lassitude succeeded to the tumult I had before endured, and I threw myself on the bed in my clothes, endeavouring to seek a few moments of forgetfulness. But it was in vain; I slept, indeed, but I was disturbed by the wildest dreams. I thought I saw Elizabeth, in the bloom of health, walking in the streets of Ingolstadt. Delighted and surprised, I embraced her, but as I imprinted the first kiss on her lips, they became livid with the hue of death; her features appeared to change, and I thought that I held the corpse of my dead mother in my arms; a shroud enveloped her form, and I saw the grave-worms crawling in the folds of the flannel. I started from my sleep with horror; a cold dew covered my forehead, my teeth chattered, and every limb became convulsed; when, by the dim and yellow light of the moon, as it forced its way through the window shutters, I beheld the wretch—the miserable monster whom I had created. He held up the curtain of the bed; and his eyes, if eyes they may be called, were fixed on me. His jaws opened, and he muttered some inarticulate sounds, while a grin wrinkled his cheeks. He might have spoken, but I did not hear; one hand was stretched out, seemingly to detain me, but I escaped and rushed downstairs. I took refuge in the courtyard belonging to the house which I inhabited, where I remained during the rest of the night, walking up and down in the greatest agitation, listening attentively, catching and fearing each sound as if it were to announce the approach of the demoniacal corpse to which I had so miserably given life.

Critique of the activity:

  1. When responding to your peer’s quotation, avoid drawing conclusion immediately. You need to read into the quotation and examine its language before you speculate what the purpose might be. You can also bring out the literary device you have noticed within  the quotation.
  2.  Your claim needs to be specific to your quotation.
  3. The thesis needs to be the synthesis of the three claims based on the quotations.
  4. The thesis needs to include the literary devices you’ll use to analyze as well as the portrayal part before you introduce your thesis. It can be written in two sentences or a complex sentence.

____________________________________

Frankenstein

You are responsible for the following words, allusions, and literary terms. You will be tested on this material in two separate tests.

FOR VOCAB TEST A

LIST A: You can find this word list on Dictionary.com:

benevolent                        calamity                               capacious                            caprice

carnage                                commiserate                      conflagration                     cursory

dilate                                     exhortation                        expedient                           fetter

ignominy                             inclemency                         indefatigable                      indolence

languid                                 countenance                       immutable                         imperious

detrimental                        emaciated                           harrowing                           epithet

debilitated                          inexorable

 

Allusions & Terms: You are responsible to look up these terms yourself.

Prometheus                       elixir of life                          Philosopher’s Stone        galvanism

Gothic                                   epistolary                            frame narrative                 Cornelius Agrippa

Paracelsus                           Albertus Magnus

 

 

FOR VOCAB TEST B

LIST B: You can find this word list on Dictionary.com:

oblivion                                paroxysm                            perdition                              physiognomy

portend                                posterity                              precipitous                          progeny

purloin                                  repugnance                        retrospect                           salubrious

sanguinary                          sophism                               sustenance                         vacillate

odious                                   penury                                  timorous                              wanton

satiate                                  wretched                             rankling                                reveries

slaked                                   prognosticated

 

 

 

AP Tutoring Schedule

AP English literature Tutoring Sessions in Room 111 with Ms. D’Amato

Weekdays on Wednesdays 3:30-5:30

  • 2/14/2018 Session 1: AP Lit MCQs Strategies and Practice part 1
  • 2/28/2018 Session 2: AP Lit MCQs Strategies and Practice part 2
  • 3/7/2018 Session 3: AP Lit MCQs Strategies and Practice PART 3
  • 3/14/2018 Session 4: AP Lit MCQs Strategies and Practice PART 4
  • 3/21/2018 Session 5: Past AP MCQ exam and review
  • 3/28/2018 Session 6: Poetry Response
  • 4/11/2018 Session 7: Poetry Response
  • 4/18/2018 Session 8: Prose Response
  • 4/25/2018 Session 9: Open-Ended Essay
  • 5/2/2018 Session 10: Open-Ended Essay

Saturday Sessions from 11:00-2:00

  • 2/10/2018 Session 1: AP Lit MCQs Strategies and Practice part 1
  • 2/24/2018 Session 2: AP Lit MCQs Strategies and Practice part 2
  • 3/3/2018 Session 3: AP Lit MCQs Strategies and Practice PART 3
  • 3/10/2018 Session 4: AP Lit MCQs Strategies and Practice PART 4
  • 3/17/2018 Session 5: Past AP MCQ exam and review
  • 3/24/2018 Session 6: Poetry Response
  • 4/14/2018 Session 7: Poetry Response
  • 4/21/2018 Session 8: Prose Response
  • 4/28/2018 Session 9: Open-Ended Essay
  • 5/5/2018 Session 10: Open-Ended Essay

Announcements & Opportunities

AP Spring Boot Camp

This is a reminder for you and your students to apply in order to attend the upcoming 2018 Spring AP Boot Camp. The goal of this Boot Camp is to provide students the opportunity to engage in targeted AP exam preparation led by experienced AP presenters. The Boot Camp will be held over a three-day period, April 6-8, at the YMCA Camp Greenkill, located in Huguenot, New York. Note: April 7 and 8 are a Saturday and Sunday, respectively. The courses that will be supported during the Boot Camp are: Biology, Calculus AB, English Language, English Literature, and United States History.

  • Student Application: Students taking AP for All supported courses are encouraged to complete the following application to be considered for participation in a three-day Spring AP Boot Camp. Apply here.
  • http://www.surveygizmo.com/s3/4089175/Spring-Advanced-Placement-Boot-Camp-Teacher-Application

Learn and Earn a Stipend of &50 per session with an SU Professor

 

Sonnet Lessons

Close Reading Unit: Sonnet        AP English Lit Class( double periods)     Ms. D’Amato

Objectives: Students will be able to select a sonnet and analyze how structure, language style and sound contribute to the theme of the sonnet “ If We Must Die” or “ Sonnet #5” from Clearances “through collaborative group discussions, gallery walk and timed writing.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.11-12.5
Analyze how an author’s choices concerning how to structure specific parts of a text  contribute to its overall structure and meaning as well as its aesthetic impact.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.11-12.4
Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.11-12.9
Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.11-12.1.D
Respond thoughtfully to diverse perspectives; synthesize comments, claims, and evidence made on all sides of an issue;

Resources:

Materials:

  • sonnet packet
  • lesson tools
  • poster papers
  • Lesson Tools: “Reciprocal discussion”; “How to write about structure?”
  • AP essay  rubric

Differentiation:
Content: Students are provided with a laptop to help them with unfamiliar vocabulary or concept as well as today’s lesson plan.

Process: Instructions are scaffolded (guided comprehension questions & graphic organizer) for students to follow. Handouts and other lesson tools are provided for students to respond to the text. Students are grouped according it their individual abilities, which are designed to enhance their learning.

Products: Choices are provided to help students complete the lesson task based on their individual abilities.

Agenda

  • Do Now ( 6 minutes)
  • Mini Lesson and Guided Practice ( 20 minutes)
  • Student Independent Practice (part 30 minutes)
  • Student Presentation ( 15 minutes)
  • Exist Slip ( 10 minutes)

Do Now: Go to the class google doc page. Write freely for 4 minutes about the sonnet you read last night. You can start with a word, line, punctuation, sound or title from the poem Group share. ( 8 minutes)

Mini Lesson and Guided Practice ( 20 minutes)

Activity 1:

We have written a paragraph about analyzing how structure of a sonnet contributes to the overall meaning. We have also worked as a group about how to write about structure. Today, we’ll read two sample paragraphs and evaluate how effectively the writer develops his or her ideas about the relationship between structure and a theme.

Use the rubric to help you review and each group decides to write two “commendations” and two “recommendations” and post them in the shared document.

Rubric for peer review:

  1. _____ Use sonnet specific language
  2. ______identify the type of sonnet
  3. ______ deconstruct the sonnet into parts
  4. ______ explain the relationship of those parts
  5. ______ infer the overall meaning of the sonnet
  6. _______identify and explain the shift in tone
  7. _______Connects cohesively the theme of the sonnet through structure
  8. _______Support the claim with specific evidence
  9. _______Analyze the evidence

Self-Reflection: Through studying the two sample paragraphs, in your notebook: jot down three ideas you have learned today about writing about structure

Activity 2: Determining Themes: ( 10 Minutes)

When reading each sonnet, consider the following-

  • What is this poem about?
  • What do you think about the language the poet uses? Why?
  • How does the internal rhyme help glue the meaning together?
  • What poetic devices are present and how do they work within the poem?
  • Slant rhyme – or near or half-rhyme – (line/linen, shook/thwack, wind/hand). Why has the poet chosen to use such rhymes?
  • Did you enjoy the sonnet or not? Please explain.

Form the list of theme below, each group will:

  • Select 2-3 themes from the list below
  • Discuss why you picked out these themes and how they connect.
  • Identify evidence ( language, syntax and structure) that illustrate the themes.

-( “If We Must Die”) Honor, Bravery, Purpose, Identity, Alienation, Rebellion, Community Development, Mortality, Masculinity and Men, and Warfare.

-( Sonnet #5) from Clearance)  Identity, Intimate Relationship, Illusion,  Togetherness, Boundary, Loss and Emotional Trauma.

Student Independent Practice (30 minutes)

Prepare for Sonnet TPCASTT  Presentation Using Presi or PPPT

Use the following questions to guide your group discussion and prepare for presentation:

  1. Who is the speaker in the poem? What kind of person is he or she?
  2. To whom is he or she speaking? In other word, describe the speaker’s audience.
  3. What is the situation and setting in time and pace?
  4. What’s the purpose of the poem?
  5. State the poem’s theme in one sentence.
  6. Explain the meaning of allusion.
  7. Describe the structure of the poem. What type of sonnet is the poem? What’s its meter and form? ( use the handout provided) How does the sound (rhyme, alliteration) contribute to the meaning of the poem?
  8. How does the structure of the poem contribute to the overall meaning or theme of the poem?( use the handout provided)
  9. What’s the tone of the poem? How is it achieved? Examine the use of DIDLS ( on the wall display).
  10. Recognize and discuss examples pf paradoxoverstatement, and understatement.
  11. Explain any symbols. Is the poem allegorical?Exist Slip: Individually, write in google doc( email me) or a piece of paper( leave it on my desk)-How does the fixed poetic form contribute to the overall meaning of the Holy Sonnet#9 ? Is it effective? Why?

Check for Understanding: Group Presentation (15)

Exit Slip(10): Create an outline of the essay with a clear thematic statement in your thesis.

Homework: Select one of the sonnets we have read in class. Write the 1st draft of the essay analyzing how structure, language and syntax contribute to the theme.

___________________________________________________________________________

Lesson 11 Sonnet ( Double Periods 86 minutes)

Objectives: Students will be able to analyze how sonnet as a fixed poetic form contributes to the overall meaning of the text through collaborative group discussions and gallery walk.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.11-12.5
Analyze how an author’s choices concerning how to structure specific parts of a text  contribute to its overall structure and meaning as well as its aesthetic impact.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.11-12.4
Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.11-12.9
Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.11-12.1.D
Respond thoughtfully to diverse perspectives; synthesize comments, claims, and evidence made on all sides of an issue;

Resources:

Materials:

Differentiation:
Content: Students are provided with a laptop to help them with unfamiliar vocabulary or concept s well as today’s lesson plan.

Process: Instructions are scaffolded ( guided comprehension questions & graphic organizer) for students to follow. Handouts and other lesson tools are provided for students to respond to the text. Students are grouped according it their individual abilities, which are designed to enhance their learning.

Products: Choices are provided to help students complete the lesson task based on their individual abilities.

Agenda

  • Do Now ( 10 minutes)
  • Mini Lesson and Guided Practice ( 15 minutes)
  • Student Independent Practice (part 1 20 minutes)
  • Student Independent Practice ( part 2 20 minutes)
  • Gallery Walk ( 10 minutes)
  • Exist Slip ( 7-9 minutes)

Do Now: ( 10 minutes)

Look at

Pay particular attentions to the form of each photo. Select one photo where the ” form” (how the objects/signifiers we see on the photo are organized) adds meaning to the image. How does form impact a viewing/”reading” experience? Ink-Pair-share.

 Mini Lesson & Guided Practice (10 minutes)

A. What’s form in poetry?

Read the glossary in PoetryArchive.org website and in your own words, define the term.

For example, Form, in poetry, can be understood as the physical structure of the poem: the length of the lines, their rhythms, their system of rhymes and repetition. In this sense, it is normally reserved for the type of poem where these features have been shaped into a pattern, especially a familiar pattern.

Or Poetic form refers to a poem’s physical structure; basically, what the poem looks like and how it sounds. Elements like the poem’s type, stanza structure, line lengths, rhyme scheme, and rhythm express its form. Together, content and form make meaning, which is the message the poet gives to the reader.

B. How do we recognize a poetic form as sonnet?

Petrarchan/Italian Sonnet( poets.org)

  • The Petrarchan sonnet is divided into two stanzas, the octave (the first eight lines) followed by the answering sestet (the final six lines).
  • The tightly woven rhyme scheme, abba, abba, cdecde or cdcdcd, is suited for the rhyme-rich Italian language,
  • Since the Petrarchan presents an argument, observation, question, or some other answerable charge in the octave, a turn, or volta, occurs between the eighth and ninth lines.
  • This turn marks a shift in the direction of the foregoing argument or narrative, turning the sestet into the vehicle for the counterargument, clarification, or whatever answer the octave demands.

Shakespearean Sonnet ( poets.org)

  • three quatrains and a couplet follow this rhyme scheme: abab, cdcd, efef, gg.
  • Qutrains pose questions
  • The couplet plays a pivotal role, usually arriving in the form of a conclusion, amplification, or even refutation of the previous three stanzas, often creating an epiphanic quality to the end

Guided Practice

Read John Donne’s “ Holy Sonnet #9″ ( page 19) and pay attention to its rhyming scheme and structure

  1. Ask a student to read out loud the poem -under  words you don’t know
  2. Read the poem again. Circle details that stand out because they are interesting or strange.
  3. Now look up the words you don’t know from the laptop and jot down the definitions.
  4. Pose a question on a post it before discussing the poem using the questions below. Park your questions on your desk.

Check for understanding: What type of sonnet is “Holy Sonnet #9”? Is it made up by three quatrains and a couplet as in an English sonnet or a Octave and Sestet as in an Italian sonnet?

Student Independent Practice ( 50 Minutes)

Discuss the poem by using the following questions. Be sure to use the handout ( Sonnet Lesson Tool) to assist you . You will only share your responses to Questions 7, 8 & 9 on a poster paper before we do a Gallery Walk to share your analysis of the sonnet.

(20 minutes)  Discuss questions 1-6 & 10 and 11 ( part 1)

(20 minutes) Discuss  questions 7, 8 & 9 ( part 2)- needs to be displayed on a poster paper

(10 minutes) Share and comment on each other’s analysis of form by doing a Gallery Walk

  1. Who is the speaker in the poem? What kind of person is he or she?
  2. To whom is he or she speaking? In other word, describe the speaker’s  audience.
  3. What is the situation and setting in time and pace?
  4. What’s the purpose of the poem?
  5. State the poem’s theme in one sentence.
  6. Explain the meaning of allusion.
  7. Describe the structure of the poem. What type of sonnet is the poem? What’s its meter and form? ( use the handout provided) How does the sound ( rhyme, alliteration) contribute to the meaning of the poem?
  8. Ho does the structure of the poem contribute to the overall meaning or theme of the poem?( use the handout provided)
  9. What’s the tone of the poem? How is it achieved? Examine the use of DIDLS ( on the wall display).
  10. Recognize and discuss examples pf paradox, overstatement, and understatement.
  11. Explain any symbols. Is the poem allegorical?Exist Slip: Individually, write in google doc( email me) or a piece of paper( leave it on my desk)-How does the fixed poetic form contribute to the overall meaning of the Holy Sonnet#9 ? Is it effective? Why?

Homework:

  • Do a free focused writing on how the form of the poem contributes to the meaning of the poem.
  • Answer MCQs
  • Continue reading Metamorphosis by Kafka.

Lesson Agenda for 9/26/2017

Objectives: Students will be able to use the AP Poetry analysis essay rubric to evaluate each other and their own work.

Period 2 Agenda:

  1. Partner up with a student who has written at least one draft of the comparison and contrast essay.
  2. In google drive, use the rubric provided peer review each other’s work.
  3. Write your Commendations and Recommendations in sentences in the space at the end of your partner’s essay.
  4. Save the peer review comments in a separate file before you start revising the essay following your reviewer’s comments.
  5. Revise your essay ( draft 3).

Period 3 Agenda

  1. Read the poem Metamorphosis  by Linda Bierds
  2. Complete a TPCASST analysis using a larger poster( the template is on the classroom wall) . Make sure you only include participating students’ names on the poster.

Homework:

  • Continue revising your Emily Dickinson Frost essay.
  • Respond to the poem “Metamorphosis” by making a personal connection or providing a personal observations of everyday Metamorphosis you see in the world we live in.