Metamorphosis

Unit Plan

Objectives

Students will be able to

  • discuss the use of symbols in literature;
  • examine the text through a specific literary lens or philosophical movement
  • create an artistic project to convey their interpretation of the novella

Materials

  • Poster Paper,  markers, laptop, Power Point
  • Copies of Metamorphosis , by Franz Kafka

Resources: Discussion Questions

Integration of Knowledge and Ideas:

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.11-12.7
Analyze multiple interpretations of a story, drama, or poem
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.11-12.3
Analyze the impact of the author’s choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.11-12.2
Determine two or more themes or central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text,
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.11-12.3
Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different contexts,
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.11-12.2
Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.11-12.4
Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience
Do Now: When and where did you experience or witness an act of dehumanization? Describe the incident and how that made you feel. Ink-pair-share.
Mini Lesson
Watch a short video of Kafka 
  • Jot down three points from the video you want to share with the class
  • Raise one question you want to ask me or the class
  • Make a claim about Kafka

Guided Practice:

In the following activity, you will read a biographical essay that predominantly focuses on several works of Franz Kafka.  Using the essay, answer the following questions in complete sentences and quoting particular information when necessary. Each group will be assigned to answer a set f questions from the reading.

EXPERIENCES SOCIAL PREJUDICE EARLY IN LIFE

  1. Where was Kafka born? What do you know about his experience here?

ANSWER in complete setences:  Kafka was born in Prague in 1883.  It was part of the Austro-Hungarian empire.  Jews lived apart from other groups of people in ghettos.

  1. What do we learn about Kafka’s relationship with his father? How did it affect him?
  2. Who is Max Brod? What does he have to do with Kafka’s literary career?
  3. What features characterized Kafka’s early writing?
  4. How old was Kafka when he died? What killed him?
  5. How does Hermann Hesse explain the basic meaning of Kafka’s The Trial?
  6. What does The Trial symbolize?
  7. What “seems to have been [Kafka’s] intention” when creating the trial?
  8. What does Vannatta say that Kafka “dramatizes” more than any other writer?
  9. What do Kafka’s stories “strain with”?
  10. Summarize the basic plot of The Metamorphosis.
  11. What is odd about the way the author depicts Gregor’s transformation?

Groups share with the class.

Check for understanding: after reading the biographical information, what prominent themes do you expect to encounter in The Metamorphosis?

Independent Practice

In part, you will read how one man reacts when the world of dreams seems to have intruded upon the real world.  Right away, “The Metamorphosis” draws readers into the nightmarish world of Gregor Samsa, a young man who has mysteriously undergone a monstrous transformation.

For many readers, Gregor’s dehumanizing metamorphosis and alienation symbolize fear and insecurity within the human condition during modern times.  As you read this puzzling work, keep in mind that scholars and critics have argued for almost a century about what it means. One reason for Kafka’s immense influence and popularity is this openness to many interpretations.

Chapter 1 assignment:

After you finish reading Chapter 1, answer the following questions thoroughly to help you understand the events that take place in chapter 1. * The more you take notes and develop your answers, the better you will understand what you read.

 REMEMBER: Kafka is not the kind of writer who will take you by the hand and lead you into his meaning, you will need to find your way there yourself.

  1. How does Gregor feel about his job?  What evidence in the story reveals his feelings?
  2. What is Gregor’s role in his family?  Why does he have so much responsibility?  How is this role about to change?
  3. What happens to Gregor when he leaves his room to meet the office manager? What does this episode reveal about Gregor’s father?
  4. From Gregor’s point of view, what might be some positive aspects of his metamorphosis into an insect?
  5. What circumstances in Gregor’s life might have caused him to feel dehumanized, even before the metamorphosis took place?
  6. In part one, Kafka portrays Gregor as a dual being, both human and insect.  For example,  he must figure out how his new body functions, while at the same time he has the thoughts and feelings of a human.  Make a chart, with “HUMAN” vs. “INSECT”, and write down quotes or details that characterize each side from chapter 1.

Exist Slip: What’s the most convincing example that Gregor’s metamorphosis symbolizes dehumanization and alienation?

Homework:  Unpacking Passages( HANDOUT)

_______________________________________________________________________

Lesson 2 ( double period 85 minutes)

Objectives: Students will be able to analyze and illustrate a theme embedded in the novella Metamorphosis by zeroing in on the language details of specific passages by using PBFF strategy in a collaborative learning group. 

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.11-12.7
Analyze multiple interpretations of a story, drama, or poem
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.11-12.3
Analyze the impact of the author’s choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.11-12.2
Determine two or more themes or central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text,

Differentiation:
Content: Students are provided with a laptop to help them with unfamiliar vocabulary or concepts and follow closely the lesson plan posted online daily.

Process: Instructions are scaffolded ( guided comprehension questions & graphic organizer) for students to follow. Handouts and other lesson tools are provided for students to respond to the text. Students are grouped according to their individual abilities, which are designed to enhance their learning.

Products: Choices are provided to help students complete the lesson task based on their individual abilities.

( 8 minutes) Do Now: Identify a one -sentence quotation from part 1( pages 11-24) of the novella and explain why it stood out to you( use a short phrase). Ink-Pair-Share. ( Write on a small construction paper)

Mini Lesson with Guided Practice ( 15 minutes)

We’ll do Passage-based Free Focused( PBFF) Writing by using the five analytical steps. To save time, we’ll use the lesson tool of ” Teacher Model” response as an example for the PBFF. It essentially explicates the process how we read, analyze and make claims accordingly.

We’ll use the following quotation to study the process together:

“He lay on his back , which was as hard as armor plate, and when he lifted his head a little, he saw his vaulted brown belly, sectioned by arch-shaped ribs, to whose dome the cover, about to slide off completely, could barely cling. His many legs, pitifully thin compared with the size of the rest of him, were waving helplessly before his eyes.”( 11)

Follow the prompts in the lesson tool. Read and analyze the response of each step. Mark in the tool any area you have trouble understanding or want to discuss further. In 10 minutes, you’ll present your findings of this activity.

In a small group, start the process.You’ll have 10 minutes to do the activity. In each group, be sure to have a facilitator, a timer, a recorder and presenter.

Passage-Based Focused Freewriting Strategy

  1. Step 1: Choose a limited piece of concrete evidence to focus on and write about it without stopping for 18-10 minutes. Pick a passage you find interesting and that you probably don’t quite understand. Copy out the passage at the beginning of your freewrite. This act will encourage attention to the words and induce you to notice more about the particular features of your chosen passage.
  2. Step 2: Contextualize the evidence. Where does the passage come from in the text? Of what larger discussion is it a part? Briefly answering these questions will prevent you from taking things out of context.
  3. Step 3: Focus on what the text is inviting you to think—its point of view—not on what you think, your point of view of that subject.
  4. Step 4: Make observations about the evidence. Stay close to the data you’ve quoted, paraphrasing key phrases in the passage and teasing out the possible meanings of these words. Then reflect on what you’ve come to better understand through paraphrasing.
  5. Step 5: Share your reasoning about what the evidence means. As you move from observation to implication, remember that you need to explain how the data mean what you claim they mean.
  6. Step 6: Address how the passage is representative, how it connects to broader issues in the reading. Move from your analysis of local details to consider what the work as a whole may plausibly be “saying” about this or that issue or question. It’s okay to work with the details for almost the entire time and then press yourself to an interpretive leap with the prompt, “I’m almost out of time but my big point is…”

Students Independent Practice ( 2 tasks)

Task 1: Each group selects one quotation and practice writing PBFF. Share your PBFF in google doc. Present to the class. ( 30 minutes)

Check for understanding: teacher and peer provide feedback

Task 2: Complete the SELECT Task ( 30 minutes). Share your group SELECT project with me via google doc.

Now also  in a small group, complete a SELECT EXPLANATION.

S Speaker:  Identify the speaker of the passage.-
E Events:  What is going on when this passage occurs?
L Literary devices and language—identify important uses of literary devices and particular language from the passage, including: imagery, symbolism, foreshadowing, etc.
E Explain:  Explain the significance of and reason for usage of meaningful words (diction) in this passage.
C Context:  Show how this passage relates to the rest of the text so far.
T Themes:  Identify how this passage relates to the themes of the text

Directions:  Choose four of the quotes below and complete a SELECT explanation.

1) “He lay on his back, which was as hard as armor plate, and when he lifted his head a little, he saw his vaulted brown belly, sectioned by arch-shaped ribs, to whose dome the cover, about to slide off completely, could barely cling. His many legs, pitifully thin compared with the size of the rest of him, were waving helplessly before his eyes.”

2) “But still, the others now believed that there was something the matter with him and were ready to help him […] He felt integrated into human society once again and hoped for marvelous, amazing feats from both the doctor and the locksmith, without really distinguishing sharply between them.”

3) “Oh God,” he thought, “what a grueling job I’ve picked! […] I’ve got the torture of traveling, worrying about changing trains, eating miserable food at all hours, constantly seeing new faces, no relationships that last or get more intimate.”

4) “A man might find for a moment that he was unable to work, but that’s exactly the right time to remember his past accomplishments and to consider that later on, when the obstacle has been removed, he’s bound to work all the harder and more efficiently […] the traveling salesman, who is out of the office practically the whole year round, can so easily become the victim of gossip, contingencies, and unfounded accusations, against which he’s completely unable to defend himself.”

5) “On the wall directly opposite hung a photograph of Gregor from his army days in a lieutenant’s uniform, his hand on his sword, a carefree smile on his lips, demanding respect for his bearing and rank.”

7) “He saw clearly that in bed he would never think things through to a rational conclusion. He remembered how even in the past he had often felt some kind of slight pain […] which, when he got up, turned out to be purely imaginary.”

6) “Gregor immediately fell down with a little cry onto his numerous little legs. This had hardly happened when for the first time that morning he had a feeling of physical well-being […] and he already believed that final recovery from all his suffering was imminent.”

7)  “He was lying on his back as hard as armor plate, and when he lifted his head a little, he saw his vaulted brown belly, sectioned by arch-shaped ribs, to whose dome the cover, about to slide off completely, could barely cling. His many legs, pitifully thin compared with the size of the rest of him, were waving helplessly before his eyes.”

Exit Slip( 5 minutes): Reflect on the writing process and how it helped you determine themes.

Homework: Write a well-developed paragraph individually to analyze a theme using SELECT worksheet.

_________________________________________________________________

Your Task: THE METAMORPHOSIS IMPORTANT PASSAGE EXPLORATION

Working with a partner, select an important passage/quotation from Part I of The Metamorphosis.  Your job is to prepare a short presentation/visual based on a quotation that you select.  You will be given some time to work with your partner to prepare (on a poster paper or power point):

  1. A drawing or visual representation of the theme/idea expressed in the quote.
  2. A 3-5 sentence explanation of the quote—Who is speaking? At what point of the story does this quote occur? What’s going on plot-wise during this passage?
  3. A 3-5 sentence analysis of the quote—Which of the themes does this quote relate to? What does this passage reveal about the speaker(s)?  Are there particular words/images invoked in the passage?  What do they reveal?  This is your opportunity to show your deeper thinking about the passage.  

You will be evaluated based on:

  1. Visual Representation. Fills the page, colorful, represents the theme of the passage/text.
  2. Quote explanation. Places the quote in context in the novel, reaches sentence limit.
  3. Quote Analysis. Not just plot summary, provides insight into the themes revealed.
  4. Sharing with the group with poise and explanation (not just reading off of the paper).

Some emerging themes:

isolation/alienation • familial relationships • identity • social class/work • transformation

Exit Slip: How did you select images or symbols to represent a theme?

Homework: be prepared to join the discussion of questions based on Part 2 of the novella.

__________________________________

Lesson 4

Objectives: Students will be able to analyze and illustrate a theme embedded in the novella Metamorphosis by zeroing in on the language details of specific passages by using five analytical steps strategy in a collaborative learning group.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.11-12.7
Analyze multiple interpretations of a story, drama, or poem
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.11-12.3
Analyze the impact of the author’s choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.11-12.2
Determine two or more themes or central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text,

Differentiation:
Content: Students are provided with a laptop to help them with unfamiliar vocabulary or concepts and follow closely the lesson plan posted online daily.

Process: Instructions are scaffolded ( guided comprehension questions & graphic organizer) for students to follow. Handouts and other lesson tools are provided for students to respond to the text. Students are grouped according to their individual abilities, which are designed to enhance their learning.

Products: Choices are provided to help students complete the lesson task based on their individual abilities.

Agenda

  1. Do Now
  2. Mini LESSON ON 5 ANALYTICAL STEPS

Do Now: What does analysis mean to you? Give an example. Pair share.

Mini Lesson with Guided Practice

Find a quotation you want to use for practice as we move alone with the 5 steps.

Five Analytical Moves

Move 1: Suspend judgment

  • The tendency to judge everything—to respond with likes and dislikes, with agreeing and disagreeing—shuts down our ability to be reminded of the pervasiveness of this phenomenon. In other words, you should seek to understand the subject you are analyzing before judging/deciding how you feel about it.

Move 2: Define significant parts and how they’re related

  • The process of analysis:
    • Divide the subject into its defining parts, its main elements or ingredients.
    • Consider how these parts are related, both to each other and to the subject as a whole.
  • This step requires us to pay close attention to detail. You’d also need to shift your attention to different elements of the talk and how they fit together. By doing so, it allows you to move from generalization to analysis, from the larger subject to its key components.

Move 3: Look for patterns of repetition and contrast and for anomalies

  • Use The Method
    • What repeats?
    • What goes with what? (strands)
    • What is opposed to what? (binaries)
      • For all of these questions, SO WHAT?
    • What doesn’t fit? (anomalies) So what?

Move 4: Make the implicit explicit

  • Techniques like Paraphrase X 3 allows you to examine evidence and draw conclusions that are not literally present but that follow from what the writer sees. This process of drawing out implications is also known as making inferences. Implications describe something suggested by the material itself whereas inference describes your thinking process, what you think the subject implies.

Move 5: Keep reformulating questions and explanations

  • Brainstorm questions that can help you locate and try on explanations for the meaning of various patterns of details.
    • Which details seem significant? Why?
    • What does the detail mean?
    • What else might it mean?
    • How do the details fit together? What do they have in common?
    • What does this pattern of details mean?
    • What else might this pattern of details mean?
    • What details don’t seem to fit? How might they be connected with other details to form a different pattern?
    • What does this new pattern mean? How might it cause me to read the meaning of individual details differently?

Student Independent Practice

Part I: After you finish reading PART 1, answer the following questions thoroughly to help you understand the events that take place in chapter 1. * The more you take notes and develop your answers, the better you will understand what you read.

 REMEMBER: Kafka is not the kind of writer who will take you by the hand and lead you into his meaning, you will need to find your way there yourself.

  1. How does Gregor feel about his job?  What evidence in the story reveals his feelings?
  2. What is Gregor’s role in his family?  Why does he have so much responsibility?  How is this role about to change?
  3. What happens to Gregor when he leaves his room to meet the office manager? What does this episode reveal about Gregor’s father?
  4. From Gregor’s point of view, what might be some positive aspects of his metamorphosis into an insect?
  5. What circumstances in Gregor’s life might have caused him to feel dehumanized, even before the metamorphosis took place?
  6. In part one, Kafka portrays Gregor as a dual being, both human and insect.  For example,  he must figure out how his new body functions, while at the same time he has the thoughts and feelings of a human.  Make a chart, with “HUMAN” vs. “INSECT”, and write down quotes or details that characterize each side from chapter 1.

Part II: Present the visual representation of a quotation

Exist Slip: What extra step can you take to bring out more hidden meaning from the quotation in your project after we have learned the 5 analytical step?

Homework: Use the same quotation or select a new quotation for this exercise.

______________________________

Lesson 5

Objectives: Students will be able to identify and analyze strands in the evidence they have gathered  from the novella Metamorphosis by zeroing in on the language details of specific passages by using five analytical steps strategy in a collaborative learning group.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.11-12.7
Analyze multiple interpretations of a story, drama, or poem
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.11-12.3
Analyze the impact of the author’s choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.11-12.2
Determine two or more themes or central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text,

Differentiation:
Content: Students are provided with a laptop to help them with unfamiliar vocabulary or concepts and follow closely the lesson plan posted online daily.

Process: Instructions are scaffolded ( guided comprehension questions & graphic organizer) for students to follow. Handouts and other lesson tools are provided for students to respond to the text. Students are grouped according to their individual abilities, which are designed to enhance their learning.

Products: Choices are provided to help students complete the lesson task based on their individual abilities.

Do Now: As a group, create a T-Chart of ” Vermin vs Human” about Gregor.

Mini Lesson:

Writing a critical summary of part 2

  1. Look at the storyboard you have created, what specific theme do you ” see” surfacing form them?
  2. Bear that theme in your mind, write a 3-5 sentences of critical summary to describe part 2 of the novella. How will your critical summary ( context) help the reader get ready to read and understand your specific evidence and analysis?

Reflection: How does a critical summary create an essential context for your analysis?

Student Independent Practice

In a small group, respond critically to the questions. Be sure to provide evidence to support your response.

Kafka’s Metamorphosis Part II

  1. Some critics suggest that Gregor’s growing appreciation of his antennae and his loss of interest in milk hints at Gregor’s loss of humanity. Do you agree or disagree?  Explain your reasoning.  What other ways does Gregor appear to be “adjusting” to his condition?  Why do you think that Gregor needs to crawl under the couch to feel comfortable?
  2. What human qualities does Gregor still possess? In what ways is he still “human”?
  3. How does Gregor treat his family during Part II? Why does he act this way?  What does this tell you about Gregor as a person?  How does this compare to the way that Gregor’s family treats him?
  4. How does Gregor’s room change as Part II moves along? What do you think this means?  Why is this significant?
  5. Do you think that Gregor’s life as a bug is better or worse than his life as a traveling salesman?
  6. Why do you think that Gregor’s father attacks him toward the end of this chapter? Why do you think this is? What is Kafka trying to indicate with this act of violence?
  7. In describing the father’s change, the narrator says:

“Now, however, he was standing starkly upright, dressed in a taut blue uniform with gold buttons like the ones servants in banking institutions wore; his prominent double chin expanded above the high, stiff, pleated collar; from underneath the bushy eyebrows a bright, alert, and penetrating gaze came forth from his black eyes; the normally disheveled white hair was meticulously combed down and precisely parted.  He flung his hat, upon which a gold monogram (probably of a bank) was set, across the entire room onto the couch and, with the long coattails of his uniform thrown back, went up to Gregor with a determined face and his hands in his pants pockets” (Kafka 47).

From the preceding description, what sticks out to you?  How is Gregor’s father characterized in this scene?  What do you think has made him feel empowered?  What is he planning to do to Gregor?

Check for Understanding: Present your responses to the class.

Homework: Complete Gregor’s  Family relationship chart and Gregor’s metamorphosis as Allegory.

____________________________________

Lesson 6

Students will be able to analyze the use of symbolism and allegorical meaning of the novella by engaging in carousing activity and complete a written assignment.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.11-12.7
Analyze multiple interpretations of a story, drama, or poem
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.11-12.3
Analyze the impact of the author’s choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.11-12.2
Determine two or more themes or central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text,

Differentiation:
Content: Students are provided with a laptop to help them with unfamiliar vocabulary or concepts and follow closely the lesson plan posted online daily.

Process: Instructions are scaffolded ( guided comprehension questions & graphic organizer) for students to follow. Handouts and other lesson tools are provided for students to respond to the text. Students are grouped according to their individual abilities, which are designed to enhance their learning.

Products: Choices are provided to help students complete the lesson task based on their individual abilities.

Do Now: Pick an Aesop’s fable to read and discuss what the story means to you. Pair share.

Mini Lesson and Guided Practice

How to read an allegory?

Gregor’s Metamorphosis as Allegory                             Name: __________________________

An allegory is a story in which characters, events, and settings symbolize abstract or moral concepts from the real world.  Using PASSAGES/QUOTES from the text as needed, explain the following allegorical connections to The Metamorphosis.  In other words, explain how/when these ideas are developed in the text.

 

QUESTION QUOTE FROM BOOK YOUR EXPLANATION CONNECTION TO REAL WORLD:

Think of a real-world situation that relates to this/these idea(s).

The isolation of an individual results in a spiritual death that dehumanizes the lonely person.  In what ways is Gregor “dehumanized” by his isolation?  What about his life leads him to feel isolated?
Meaningless work or drudgery alienates the individual from living an authentic, meaningful life.  Find a quote that describes Gregor’s “meaningless work.”  How does this make him feel?
In the complicated modern world, the search for meaning is futile (or pointless).
Dysfunctional family dynamics can destroy an individual.  Find a quote that demonstrates the “dysfunction” of Gregor’s family.  How does this make him feel?

Part 2: Symbolism in Metamorphosis

Read a scholarly article on the topic. We’ll share ideas by doing a jigsaw reading activity.

Read the article ” Breaking and Making Meaning” ” Four level allegory”

How does the author discuss symbolism in Metamorphosis? What are his claims, reasons and evidence?

Homework: Read and annotate ” Making and Breaking Meaning: Deconstruction, Four Level Allegory and The Metamorphosis”.

_______________________________________________

Lesson 7

Students will be able to analyze the use of symbolism and allegorical meaning of the novella by engaging in jigsaw activity and complete a written assignment.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.11-12.7
Analyze multiple interpretations of a story, drama, or poem
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.11-12.3
Analyze the impact of the author’s choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.11-12.2
Determine two or more themes or central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text,

Differentiation:
Content: Students are provided with a laptop to help them with unfamiliar vocabulary or concepts and follow closely the lesson plan posted online daily.

Process: Instructions are scaffolded ( guided comprehension questions & graphic organizer) for students to follow. Handouts and other lesson tools are provided for students to respond to the text. Students are grouped according to their individual abilities, which are designed to enhance their learning.

Products: Choices are provided to help students complete the lesson task based on their individual abilities.

Lesson Tools:

  1. LITERARY CRITICISM THEORIES
  2. Literary lenses

Agenda

  1. Share symbolism worksheet
  2. Present group reading of ” Making and Breaking meaning” using google share drive
  3. Make a list of possible themes.
  4. Write a written response to how the novella connects to our current society
  5. Introduction to literary criticism theory – by individual student
  6. Carousing various theories
  7. Each group selects one literary criticism theory to prepare for a group presentation ( Presentation on Friday)

Do Now: Share symbolism worksheet in a small group.

Part 1: Mini Lesson with Guided Practice

  • Present and discuss flashpoints from the article
  • Jot down ideas that resonate with you.
  • As a class, we select five ideas that represent our reading of the novella.

Check for understanding:

Select a theme and write a response how the character or the plot helps illustrate the universal truth.

Part 2

Mini Lesson with guided Practice

  • Introduction to literary criticism theory – by individual student- CAROUSELING
  • Teacher clarifies and answers questions

Independent Practice

  1. Each group selects one literary criticism theory to prepare for a group presentation ( Presentation on Friday)
  2. Discuss ideas in the lesson tool
  3. Do research on the theory and prepare an online powerpoint presentation

Check for Understanding:

Use one of the theories we discussed today to explain the meaning of one specific example or detail in the novella.

Homework:  Prepare for group presentation.

________________________________________

Lesson 8

Objectives: Students will be able to analyze the theme of the novella by engaging in a jigsaw activity and individual as well as group presentations.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.11-12.7
Analyze multiple interpretations of a story, drama, or poem
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.11-12.3
Analyze the impact of the author’s choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.11-12.2
Determine two or more themes or central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text,

Differentiation:
Content: Students are provided with a laptop to help them with unfamiliar vocabulary or concepts and follow closely the lesson plan posted online daily.

Process: Instructions are scaffolded ( guided comprehension questions & graphic organizer) for students to follow. Handouts and other lesson tools are provided for students to respond to the text. Students are grouped according to their individual abilities, which are designed to enhance their learning.

Products: Choices are provided to help students complete the lesson task based on their individual abilities.

Lesson Tools:

  1. LITERARY CRITICISM THEORIES
  2. Literary lenses

Do Now: Describe one insight you have gained from your group theme activity on The Metamorphosis.  Pair share.

Mini Lesson: Theme Analysis

How to write a thematic statement?

A template for writing a thematic statement:

In ___________________( title of work), ________(author’s name) uses ____________________( allegory, symbolism, satire, conflict, metaphor, etc) to __________________________________( maker verb: reveal, explore, portray, criticize, suggest, etc.) ______________________________________( the abstract: tone, theme, purpose, the writer’s opinion about the subject that must be proven).

Each group shares one thematic statement. Teacher models by proving feedback to the statement.

Guided practice:

Each group modifies one of the thematic statement and presents.

Check for understanding: Each student selects one thematic statement that you’ll use for your theme analysis essay.

________________

Lesson 9 

Objectives: Students will be able to analyze a theme of the novella Metamorphoses through a specific literary criticism lens by engaging in research and creating a group presentation.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.11-12.7
Analyze multiple interpretations of a story, drama, or poem
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.11-12.3
Analyze the impact of the author’s choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.11-12.2
Determine two or more themes or central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text,

Differentiation:
Content: Students are provided with a laptop to help them with unfamiliar vocabulary or concepts and follow closely the lesson plan posted online daily.

Process: Instructions are scaffolded ( guided comprehension questions & graphic organizer) for students to follow. Handouts and other lesson tools are provided for students to respond to the text. Students are grouped according to their individual abilities, which are designed to enhance their learning.

Products: Choices are provided to help students complete the lesson task based on their individual abilities.

Do now: Of the five isms, which one has your group decided to be the focus of your teaching a lesson to the class?

Expressionism, surrealism, existentialism,  Freudianism, Marxism, Feminism

Mini Lesson:

Introducing ISM Project 

Independent Practice

Students in small groups begin research on an assigned/ self-selected topic. Each group must incorporate the following in designing the lesson:

  1. A handout ( lesson tool in google doc or hard copies)
  2. A visual ( PPT)
  3. AN ACTIVITY TO ENGAGE YOUR PEERS ( DISCUSSION , WORKSHEET, ETC)
  4. Some kind of assessment ( so you know your peers understand what you have taught)
  5. A logical opening and closing

To prepare for your lesson, you need to –

  1. Use online resources to gain fundamental understanding of your movement
  2. With your group decide on a lesson plan to teach your classmates: the basic belief system underlying your assigned movement, the ways in which these ideas relate to Kafka’s Metamorphosis
  3. Create your handouts, visual aids and activities
  4. Signup for a time to teach your lesson ( Mon-Fri) next week. The lesson should be about 40 minutes.
  5. Teach your lesson and receive feedback from me and your peers.

Guided Practice

Show an example of student sample handout used for teaching.

Lesson Template:

  • Objectives of the lesson
  • Do now activity ( 5 minutes)
  • Mini Lesson ( provide a handout for students the fundamentals of your theory; provide an example how the theory can be applied to reading Metamorphosis( 10 minutes)
  • Check for understanding ( 5 minutes- allow your classmates to ask questions and you provide answers)
  • Student Independent Practice (provide a passage or two  from the novella and a few pointers from the theory. Ask your classmates to do an analysis of the passage through the theoretical lens provided). ( 15 minutes)
  • Ask the group to present or collect the work and grade it. ( 5 minutes)

Check for understanding: Hand in your group plan.

Homework: Review the open-ended questions for the AP Lit exam. Which question is similar to the theme you have derived based on your reading on Metamorphosis? Explain.

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Lesson 10

Objectives: Students will be able to analyze a theme in Metamorphosis by Kafka.

CCS
Determine two or more themes or central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text,

Differentiation:
Content: Students are provided with a laptop to help them with unfamiliar vocabulary or concepts and follow closely the lesson plan posted online daily.

Process: Instructions are scaffolded ( guided comprehension questions & graphic organizer) for students to follow. Handouts and other lesson tools are provided for students to respond to the text. Students are grouped according to their individual abilities, which are designed to enhance their learning.

Products: Choices are provided to help students complete the lesson task based on their individual abilities.

Do Now: Share one of your responses based on lessons on literary criticism theories at your table.

 Mini Lesson on Open-Ended Question

Deconstruction Lesson on 2014 Open Ended Question

Read a sample essay prompt from year 2011 and a sample essay

  1. Deconstruct the essay topic: what’s the abstract? what’s the concrete?
  2. Formulate a thesis statement that is not cliche.
  3. Use specific evidence in your own words to illustrate a point.
  4. Connect your argument to your thesis.

Independent Practice

Work on your writing a response to the open-ended question you have selected. You must select textual evidence from the novella Metamorphosis for your analysis. No direct quotations are permitted in the essay.

Discuss the following passage from Metamorphosis and analyze how Kafka portrays Gregor in this passage and how the portrayal contributed to an overall theme of the novella.

“Did you understand a word of all that?” the chief clerk asked his parents, “surely he’s not trying to make fools of us”. “Oh, God!” called his mother, who was already in tears, “he could be seriously ill and we’re making him suffer. Grete! Grete!” she then cried. “Mother?” his sister called from the other side. They communicated across Gregor’s room. “You’ll have to go for the doctor straight away. Gregor is ill. Quick, get the doctor. Did you hear the way Gregor spoke just now?” “That was the voice of an animal”, said the chief clerk, with a calmness that was in contrast with his mother’s screams. “Anna! Anna!” his father called into the kitchen through the entrance hall, clapping his hands, “get a locksmith here, now!” And the two girls, their skirts swishing, immediately ran out through the hall, wrenching open the front door of the flat as they went. How had his sister managed to get dressed so quickly? There was no sound of the door banging shut again; they must have left it open; people often do in homes where something awful has happened.

“Gregor, in contrast, had become much calmer. So they couldn’t understand his words any more, although they seemed clear enough to him, clearer than before – perhaps his ears had become used to the sound. They had realised, though, that there was something wrong with him, and were ready to help. The first response to his situation had been confident and wise, and that made him feel better. He felt that he had been drawn back in among people, and from the doctor and the locksmith he expected great and surprising achievements – although he did not really distinguish one from the other. Whatever was said next would be crucial, so, in order to make his voice as clear as possible, he coughed a little, but taking care to do this not too loudly as even this might well sound different from the way that a human coughs and he was no longer sure he could judge this for himself. Meanwhile, it had become very quiet in the next room. Perhaps his parents were sat at the table whispering with the chief clerk, or perhaps they were all pressed against the door and listening.”

On Translating Metamorphosis

Check for Understanding: What new insights have you gained about the theme in the novella? What contributed to the new ideas? Be specific.

Homework: Begin your drafting of the open-ended essay. What does the prompt ask you to do specifically? What details from the novella help you understand the abstract concepts and their relations? Due Friday 11/17.