Rhetorical Analysis

Writing Rhetorical Analysis

Resources:

  1. How rhetoric works
  2. Reading a cartoon in the New Yorker
  3. The art of metaphor
  4. Languguae and Thought

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3/31 Agenda

Objectives: Students will analyze a speech by writing a rhetorical essay using the SOAPStone strategy as well as the tolls provided in the rhetorical analysis handbook.

Agenda

  1. writing the essay
  2. using the model essay provided as references.
  3. using the rhetorical rubric to peer-review.
  4. using tools provided in the handbook to help you with the analysis.

Homework: Final draft due on Sunday night by 11:59 pm.

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Introduction

Part I : Literacy/Composing Purposes
Objectives: Students will be to analyze the purposes of a historical document through  examining various rhetorical devices and explain the author’s use of the strategies to reveal the purpose(s).
Determine two or more central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to provide a complex analysis; provide an objective summary of the text.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.11-12.3
Analyze a complex set of ideas or sequence of events and explain how specific individuals, ideas, or events interact and develop over the course of the text.
  • Differentiation: Students select details from the scene  based on their individual reading experience and understanding of the text. They are also given various options to respond to the poem depending on their personal level of challenges or strengths. Students can raise their own questions to probe into the implied meaning of the poem.
  • Grouping Rationale: Students will be grouped based on personal choice with consideration of individual learning needs, styles, talents and personality to maximize their productivity. In each group, all participants are contributors; but several of them will also be a timer/facilitator, recorder,presenter, spelling/ grammar checker.

Material: Rubric for rhetorical analysis, copies of famous speeches,

Texts:

  1. Bill Clinton’s ” Letter of Apology to the Japanese Americans Interned during the WWII”
  2. Obama’s inauguration speech 
  3. Reagan’s D-Day 40th Anniversary Speech

Do Now:  Do the following and share with your elbow partner your responses.

a)List three things you composed last week. Your response should not be limited to school work. Consider all kinds of compositions you have done such as emails, an Evite, lyrics, a job ( program, internship )application, a blog or research paper, text messages, Power Point presentation or a reading response, etc.

b) What did you read last week? An article, blogs, text book chapters, watching a youtube clip, songs , listening to a podcast, TV shows with subtitles, etc

Mini Lesson:

  • What does the term literary mean in today’s world? What does “multi literacies” mean?
  • Based on the “do now” activity, what do you think are the key factors in a literacy situation?

Power point on Literary Situations

In a small group, write about 5 minutes to define two of the following terms based on what your understanding. Be prepared to share with the class.

  • purpose
  • persona
  • genre
  • audience
  • medium
  • content

Let’s examine the Aristotelian triangle

Teacher Model

Read the Letter to Japanese Americans of Internment Camp

  1. Who is the primary audience ?
  2. What’s the obvious purpose? what’s the deeper purpose? Why?
  3. How do you know? What evidence supports your claim(s)?
Independent Practice

Select a text and think about the ways his purposes affect his voice, style, the tone he takes, the way he organizes his address, the kind of argument he makes,and the types of evidence he uses. Take notes on the group’s analysis of the speaker’s stated and unstated purpose and how his purpose(s) affected his voice, style;, tone, word choices, organization, arguments and evidence, etc.

  1. Obama’s inauguration speech 
  2. Reagan’s D-Day 40th Anniversary Speech

Homework: Do a purpose analysis based on the speech of your choice.

Part II

Objectives: Students will analyze how the audience can alter the speaker’s choice of words, thus revealing a different purpose.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.11-12.6
Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text in which the rhetoric is particularly effective, analyzing how style and content contribute to the power, persuasiveness or beauty of the text.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.11-12.5
Analyze and evaluate the effectiveness of the structure an author uses in his or her exposition or argument, including whether the structure makes points clear, convincing, and engaging.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.11-12.1
Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.11-12.4
Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze how an author uses and refines the meaning of a key term or terms over the course of a text (e.g., how Madison defines faction in Federalist No. 10).
  • Differentiation: Students select details from the scene  based on their individual reading experience and understanding of the text. They are also given various options to respond to the poem depending on their personal level of challenges or strengths. Students can raise their own questions to probe into the implied meaning of the poem.
  • Grouping Rationale: Students will be grouped based on personal choice with consideration of individual learning needs, styles, talents and personality to maximize their productivity. In each group, all participants are contributors; but several of them will also be a timer/facilitator, recorder,presenter, spelling/ grammar checker.

Material: Rubric for rhetorical analysis, copies of famous speeches

Do Now: Reflect two messages you sent to two very different people. Did you change the subject or language? Why? Pair share.

Mini Lesson

How does use specific diction to appeal to a specific audience ( pathos) ? How does it impact the author’s purpose?

Independent Practice

In a small group of three or four, appoint a recorder, presenter, facilitator and timer. Complete a SOAPStone analysis of one of the texts you have read and annotated with special attention to purpose audience and diction.

  1. Obama’s inauguration speech 
  2. Reagan’s D-Day 40th Anniversary Speech

We’ll discuss three passages written by Malcolm X for different audiences and purposes.

Passage 1: Excerpt from a Malcolm X speech to a Detroit Civil Rights group

Just as the slavemaster of that day used Tom, the house Negro, to keep the field Negroes in check, the same old slavemaster today has Negroes who are nothing but modern Uncle Toms, 20th century Uncle Toms, to keep you and me in check, keep us under control, keep us passive and peaceful and nonviolent. That’s Tom making you nonviolent. It’s like when you go to the dentist, and the man’s going to take your tooth. You’re going to fight him when he starts pulling. So he squirts some stuff in your jaw called novocaine, to make you think they’re not doing anything to you. So you sit there and ’cause you’ve got all of that novocaine in your jaw, you suffer peacefully. Blood running all down your jaw, and you don’t know what’s happening. ’Cause someone has taught you to suffer — peacefully.

Passage 2: Excerpt from a Malcolm X speech to Harvard Law School

There was another man back in history whom I read about once, an old friend of mine whose name was Hamlet, who confronted, in a sense, the same thing our people are confronting here in America. Hamlet was debating whether “To be or not to be”—that was the question. He was trying to decide whether it was “nobler in the mind to suffer, peacefully, the slings and arrows of outrageous fortune” or whether it was nobler “to take up arms” and oppose them. I think his little soliloquy answers itself. As long as you sit around suffering the slings and arrows and are afraid to use some slings and arrows yourself, you’ll continue to suffer. The OAAU has come to the conclusion that it is time to take up whatever means necessary to bring these sufferings to a halt.

Passage 3: Excerpt from a Malcolm X speech to the Nation of Islam

God’s Judgement of White America (The Chickens Come Home to Roost)
Malcolm X, edited by Imam Benjamin Karim

December 4 , 1963

note – this speech was delivered before Malcolm left the Nation of Islam and accepted true Islam — so his views in this speech do not reflect his own or those he held near the end of his life.

This speech is sometimes called “The Chickens Come Home To Roost,” because of an answer Malcolm X gave in response to a question following the speech. The question concerned the late President John Kennedy. It was Malcolm X’s answer, that the Presidents death was a case of “chickens coming home to roost” — that the violence that Kennedy had failed to stop had come back to him, this resulted in the Elijah Muhammad silencing him. Malcolm X left the Nation of Islam a short time later.

The Honorable Elijah Muhammad teaches us that as it was the evil sin of slavery that caused the downfall and destruction of ancient Egypt and Babylon, and of ancient Greece, as well as ancient Rome, so it was the evil sin of colonialism (slavery, nineteenth-century European style) that caused the collapse of the white nations in present-day Europe as world powers. Unbiased scholars and unbiased observers agree that the wealth and power of white Europe has rapidly declined during the nineteen-year period between World War II and today.

So we of this present generation are also witnessing how the enslavement of millions of black people in this country is now bringing White America to her hour of judgment, to her downfall as a respected nation. And even those Americans who are blinded by childlike patriotism can see that it is only a matter of time before White America too will be utterly destroyed by her own sins, and all traces of her former glory will be removed from this planet forever.

The Honorable Elijah Muhammad teaches us that as it was divine will in the case of the destruction of the slave empires of the ancient and modern past, America’s judgement and destruction will also be brought about by divine will and divine power. Just as ancient nations paid for their sins against humanity, White America must now pay for her sins against twenty-two million “Negroes.” White America’s worst crimes her hypocrisy and her deceit. White America pretends to ask herself: “What do these Negroes want?” White America knows that four hundred years of cruel bondage has made these twenty-two million ex-slaves too (mentally) blind to see what they really want.

White America should be asking herself: “What does God want for these twenty-two million ex-slaves?” Who will make White America know what God wants? Who will present God’s plan to White America? What is God’s solution to the problem caused by the presence

Homework:

  • Write a paragraph analyzing the purpose of either Reagan or Obama’s speech.  As you read the speech, analyze the ways his purposes affect his voice and style, the tone he takes, the way he organizes his address, the kind of argument he makes and the type of evidence he uses.
  • Write a paragraph analyzing the ways an audience shapes a composition ( speech). Identify the target audience and explain why you think the target audience is(language used, imagery or syntax) how the target audience shapes the speech(tone), and why you think the speech is effective in appealing to the target audience( pathos).

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Part III

Objectives: Students will be able to analyze literacy personas of a complex passage by examining rhetorical appeals implied.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.11-12.6
Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text in which the rhetoric is particularly effective, analyzing how style and content contribute to the power, persuasiveness or beauty of the text.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.11-12.5
Analyze and evaluate the effectiveness of the structure an author uses in his or her exposition or argument, including whether the structure makes points clear, convincing, and engaging.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.11-12.1
Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.11-12.4
Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze how an author uses and refines the meaning of a key term or terms over the course of a text (e.g., how Madison defines faction in Federalist No. 10).

Differentiation:

  • Students select details from various texts  based on their individual reading experience and understanding of the text.
  • They are also given various options to respond to the task depending on their personal level of challenges or strengths.
  • Students can raise their own questions to probe into the implied meaning of the passage.
  • Students can use video clips and online dictionary

Grouping Rationale: Students will be grouped based on personal choice with consideration of individual learning needs, styles, talents and personality to maximize their productivity. In each group, all participants are contributors; but they will take turns to be a timer, facilitator, recorder,or presenter.

Do Now: Imagine you need to email a friend and tell him/her happened in school. Then write an atoer email to your parent or teacher to report the same incident. What did you notice?

Mini Lesson: 

Literary Personas: how is it shaped by the writing situation such as purpose, audience and genre?

Watch a video of TEDTalk: What Aristotle and Joshua Bell can teach us about persuasion

Read the passage on page 15 of Everything is a Text by Dan Meltzer.

  • What specific jargon terms does he use? How does that reveal what he does?
  • What genre of writing is shown by the conventions he uses?
  • Is it possible a composer’s persona can change depending on the context of the composition?

Independent Practice

  • Share one of the paragraphs you have written ( purpose or audience) based on one of the speeches. Use the rhetorical analysis rubric to evaluate the paragraph. Give it a score and write a brief commentary why you gave the score. Pair share. Reflect.
  • Analyze the persona of the speaker ( Reagan or Obama as revealed in the specific speech he delivered).

( Exit Slip)Expected Outcome: 

  1. Hand in the Self-evaluated paragraph as well as the 2nd paragraph.
  2. Identify and analyze three pieces evidence that reveal the speaker’s persona.

Homework: Compose a well developed paragraph analyzing the persona of the speaker.

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PART IV Literacy Mediums

Objectives: Students will be able to analyze literacy mediums of a complex passage by examining rhetorical appeals implied.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.11-12.6
Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text in which the rhetoric is particularly effective, analyzing how style and content contribute to the power, persuasiveness or beauty of the text.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.11-12.5
Analyze and evaluate the effectiveness of the structure an author uses in his or her exposition or argument, including whether the structure makes points clear, convincing, and engaging.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.11-12.1
Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.11-12.4
Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze how an author uses and refines the meaning of a key term or terms over the course of a text (e.g., how Madison defines faction in Federalist No. 10).

Differentiation:

  • Students select details from various texts  based on their individual reading experience and understanding of the text.
  • They are also given various options to respond to the task depending on their personal level of challenges or strengths.
  • Students can raise their own questions to probe into the implied meaning of the passage.
  • Students can use video clips and online dictionary

Grouping Rationale: Students will be grouped based on personal choice with consideration of individual learning needs, styles, talents and personality to maximize their productivity. In each group, all participants are contributors; but they will take turns to be a timer, facilitator, recorder,or presenter.

Do Now: Think of a text that you have read in two different mediums: a book that has been made into a film, a comic strip that was made into a video game, a play that was made into a film, a book that is made into a tv show, and so forth. How did the change in medium affect the content of the composition ( purpose, audience and persona)?

Mini Lesson: 

Mode is a channel of communication- oral, visual, digital. print

Medium is the tool that the composer uses within the channel to deliver his/her message. For a composer who works in a visual mode, he can use the mediums such as photographs, painting, billboards.

COMPOSERS WHO WORK IN A PRINT MODE MAY USE MEDIUMS SUCH AS BOOKS, MAGAZINES, NEWS LETTERS, OR FLIERS.

The medium that a composer uses to deliver her message affects every aspect of the content of the message.

Let’s look at an example on pages 16-17 , an excerpt from the Tolkien’s novel The Return of the King and a film script based on the same scene.

Check for Understanding: How does the description in the book differ from the one in the script?

  • Language: detailed description of the scene and characters vs visual motion, camera angles, stage directions for close ups, sound etc.
  • Sentence Structure: long and distinctive, varied vs ” intercuts”- jumping from scene to scene

Independent Practice

Use the handout( rubric)  to draft your rhetorical analysis.

Homework: Begin to draft your final rhetorical analysis of one of the speeches by Reagan or Obama.

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Lesson 1: Rhetorical TriangleObjectives: Students will understand the rhetorical triangle and apply the knowledge to responding to passage-based multiple choice questions in small groups.CCS

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.11-12.2
Determine two or more central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to provide a complex analysis; provide an objective summary of the text.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.11-12.3
Analyze a complex set of ideas or sequence of events and explain how specific individuals, ideas, or events interact and develop over the course of the text.
Materials:
  • copies of AP Language exam
  • copies of AP Lang course descriptions

Vocabulary: Aristotelian rhetorical analysis, rhetorical traingle

Do Now:  Visit the link and read about the rhetorical triangle individually. In pairs, discuss what each diagram means in respect to rhetorical reading.
Rhetorical TriangleAristotalian TriangleRhetoricalTriangle_image
Mini Lesson and Guided Practice
Read the descriptions about rhetorical reading from pages 21-24 and jot down key ideas about each section on the poster paper. Share the ideas in class.
Group 1: rhetorical reading(21) and canon 1 & 2 of Aristotelian Rhetorical analysis (24)
Group 2: the rhetorical triangle (22-23)
Group 3: Aristotelian Rhetorical analysis (23-24)
Questions to check understanding of the reading-
  1. What does rhetorical reading mean? How is it different from simply ” reading”? (21)
  2. What is rhetorical action? How different is rhetorical analysis from literary analysis? (22)
  3. What are the four purposes of discourse according to Kinneavy?(23)
  4. Rhetorical reading is a). analytic process that begins as a search for rhetorical purpose along with verbal meaning b). asking questions of not just what the writer means to say in this text or how the author conveys the meaning but who the writer or speaker is and why and to whom s/he has chosen to write or speak these particular words on this particular occasionc). analyzing verbal texts in social contexts in terms of how texts signal the writers’ intent through such strategies as word choice, arrangement of content, representations of self and audience, appeals to reason, appeals to audience value and emotions d). all the above
  5. What are the five canons or principles of Aristotelian rhetorical analysis?What does each rhetoric mean?

Independent Practice

Discuss in groups of 2 or 3 passage-based ( first passage) the challenging Multiple-choice questions you encountered during you practice.  ( Group 1: Q1-3; Group 2: Q4-6; Group 3: Q7-9; Group 4: Q10-11)

  • Identify one example that requires  your knowledge of rhetorical reading to answer.
  • Identify the evidence that helps you determine the answer. Explain.

End of the Lesson Assessment: Share and submit evidence and explanation that support the correct answer choice.

Homework:

  1. Read passage 2 ( pages 52) and find the evidence that supports each correct answer choice. Provide some explanation if necessary.
  2. Analyze the synthesis essay directions of 2014. What does the essay ask you to do? What is the topic? What’s the situation? Who may be the reader? How are the sources used in the score 7 essay? Are they effectively used to argue for his point? Why or why not? Read the 7 sources and underline in each source two sentences that you believe suggest the author’s purpose.
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Lesson 2: Rhetorical Analysis Essay
Objectives: Students will be able to create an outline for the rhetorical analysis essay through analyzing a sample essay in a small group.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.11-12.6
Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text in which the rhetoric is particularly effective, analyzing how style and content contribute to the power, persuasiveness or beauty of the text.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.11-12.5
Analyze and evaluate the effectiveness of the structure an author uses in his or her exposition or argument, including whether the structure makes points clear, convincing, and engaging.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.11-12.1
Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.11-12.4
Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze how an author uses and refines the meaning of a key term or terms over the course of a text (e.g., how Madison defines faction in Federalist No. 10).

Differentiation:

  • Students select details from various texts  based on their individual reading experience and understanding of the text.
  • They are also given various options to respond to the task depending on their personal level of challenges or strengths.
  • Students can raise their own questions to probe into the implied meaning of the passage.
  • Students can use video clips and online dictionary

Grouping Rationale: Students will be grouped based on personal choice with consideration of individual learning needs, styles, talents and personality to maximize their productivity. In each group, all participants are contributors; but they will take turns to be a timer, facilitator, recorder,or presenter.

Do Now: In the directions for 2012 AP Language Exam, Question 2, what’s the rhetorical situation [Purpose, Audience, Persona-voice, Medium, Genre, Social Context) described]?
Mini Lesson  with Guided Practice-
Rhetorical situation:
  • Purpose: the literacy situation will play a role in construction our purposes.
  • Audience: for whom the writing is intended. It shapes a composer’s message.( different style and voice)
  • Persona: a composer’s persona includes the stances she takes, her tone, the vocabulary she uses, her voice and style- everything that makes up the image she portrays in her text. A composer’s persona is influenced by the previous texts she has read, the audience she’s composing for, and the purpose, medium, and the genre of what she’s composing. A write’s persona is socially constructed.
  • Medium: Medium and modes are closely related. If a mode is a channel of communication-oral, visual, digital, print- then a medium is the tool that the composer uses within the channel to deliver his or her message. For example, composers working in a visual mode might use medium such as photographer, paining or billboards. Composer working in a print mode might use mediums such as books, magazines, newsletters or fliers.
  • If a mode is a channel of communication-oral, visual, digital, print- then a medium is the tool that the composer uses within the channel to deliver his or her message, then genre is a form of that tool that is appropriate for specific literary situations. For example, within the oral mode of communication, there is a medium of the speech, and within the medium of speech, there are genres such as wedding toasts, political acceptance speeches, graduation speeches, etc. EACH GENRE OF SPEECH IS APPROPRIATE in a specific kind of situation (politically rally, a graduation, a wedding etc.)
  • Purpose and audience affect the persona, which is shaped by social contexts.
  • Every factor of a literary ( rhetorical) situation- purpose, persona, genre, audience, medium,- is influenced by social contexts. An audience’s ethnicity, social class, political beliefs, and so forth influence its responses to a text and a composer’s persona is shaped by her personal history and values at language communities she belongs to.

Based on the definitions of each element within rhetorical situation, explain respectively the elements as described in the direction as well as revealed by the text. Map it out in a small group or add to your presentation.

Share in class.

Independent Practice: Group presentation and discussion

While each group presents, the rest of the class provide critique. Teach lead discussion.

Introduction: 

  • Point out the specific purpose of the speech ( “condemn” companies for raising steel prices as well as ” appeal” to “everyman audience” for communal sacrifices)
  • Specify the context ( for raising steel prices)
  • Reveal/ the speaker-persona: where does the speaker stand on the issue? ( “include himself as “we”; “he is on their side; united with them”; set himself apart from another privileged group- steel executives; us vs them , contempt and righteous indignation- tone)
  • Thesis: Such us vs them distinction is a crucial justification for the contempt and righteous indignation that Kennedy heaps on the steel companies.

Body Paragraphs: Illustrate  the purpose

Body Paragraph 1

  1. In addition to his appeal to class warfare, he switches to patriotism. The speaker lists the people he wants to appeal to such as ” union workers, reservists and servicemen, every American businessman and farmer” to connote ” a fighting spirit, rugged individual ingenuity and self-reliance, ones hundred Americanism.
  2. Shift tone ( But Kennedy is not in bed with the unions by noting that the steel companies enjoy an ” unusually good labor contract” and highest earnings in history” implying that steel companies have right and reason to succeed.
  3. The economic status of the steel companies  lends further credibility to Kennedy’s condemnation( purpose) of them, in particular  after he had asked “each American and the steel companies to consider what he would do for his country”. Instead of making necessary sacrifices, they take advantages of the people and situation by increasing the prices.

Body Paragraph 2

In this paragraph, the student further complicate the situation and explain how the speaker demonstrates his persona( take American people’s side and calls for sacrifices in the crisis) and his purpose ( condemns the steel companies without alienating them or going to a war with them, instead, he uses reasons and economic facts to reveal their greed and unpatriotic action)  in the context:

  1. Further evidence of Kennedy’s rhetorical caution can be found in his disclaimer that ” price and wage decisions…are and ought to be freely and privately made.” ( the speaker clearly sows his stance on this complicated situation- he does want his audience to believe regulating prices for private companies is a norm). Because in 1962, it would have been unprecedented for a President to coerce a private company into taking a specific economic action.
  2. Shift: Yet, in this extraordinary situation, he calls for everyone’s sacrifices( But again, Kennedy invokes the uncontroversially virtuous idea of “higher…responsibility ” so as not to undermine his message. And his final closing lines, cleverly put the ball in his opponent’s court. Kennedy does not directly go on the war path or appear to be aggressive, yet manages to appear strong and principled without giving the steel companies any ammunition to respond to the actual substance of his speech.

Conclusion: In the speech, Kennedy’s clearly justifies why he condemns the greedy and unpatriotic steel companies, in the meantime, calls for ” our ” sacrifices as a nation, which includes all- the unions, service men and steel companies. He stands as a leader united with his people during ” this serious hour”.

Homework: Analyse the Question 3 sample essay ( 2008) and create an outline for the essay.

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Lesson 3

Objectives: Students will be able to gain clear understanding of how to write a rhetorical analysis essay by using SOAPStone.

Do now: Review SOAPStone using he handout given. What does each element stand for?

Mini Lesson: Review the lesson on how to write an AP Rhetorical Analysis Paragraphs and Essays ( see handout)

Independent Practice

Compose a rhetorical essay using year 2014’s Question 2 prompt.

Homework: Review more notes on rhetorical analysis essay elements and strategies.

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Agenda for the next few news before the exam on Wednesday May 11-

5/5/2016: ( at home) Write a synthesis essay ( in ink by hand)  using 2011 prompt ( 55 minutes total). Use the rubric and sample essay to review your own essay and hand in your critiqued essay  as well as questions you still have about writing the synthesis essay.

5/6/2016 ( during periods 1 & 4):

  • Per 1: Review all handouts relating to the rhetorical analysis. ( use the lesson above).
  • Per 4:Write a rhetorical essay on demand ( 40 minutes by hand in ink) using the prompt of 2014 ( in the Question 2 packet).
  • ( At home): Review your own rhetorical essay by using the rubric and sample essay.

Over the weekend: Review

  1. Practice a new set of multiple choice questions (optional)
  2. Practice writing an essay on Question 3 based on year 2015.( required)
  3. Practice writing on an synthesis essay and rhetorical analysis by using a past prompt in the College Board website. ( optional)