Siddhartha

Unit 2: Indian Literature of Enlightenment

Session 1 Writing

Objectives: Students will do research on the Eastern and Western concept of Enlightenment and compare their findings.

Aim: How different and similar are Eastern and Western concpet of Enlightenment?

Do Now; What do you know about Enlightenment era in westen history? what do you know about Hinduism?

Resources

Mini Lesson

  1. Share ideas abour our findings about the western and eastern concept of Enlightenment.
  2. Enlightenment can be referred to as a religion, concept or philosophy or movement. We’ll discuss the menaing of each reference.

Your Turn to Practice: Which meaning do we mainly refer to? How is the word used in our daily language?

Homework: Create a chart that shows the differences when Enlightenment is referred to as a religion, conceot, philosophy or movement.

Session 2 Reading

Objectives: Students will analyze the true reason of Siddhartha’s discontent.

Aim: What causes Siddhartha to leave his comfortable life behind? Is he simply seeking the independence of adulthood? WHy or why not?

Do Now: What is the difference between persona and self? ( page 10)

Resources:

Vocabulary:

  1. ablution:the act of washing oneself (often used for humorously formal effect).
  2. Atman: a Sanskrit word that means ‘inner-self’ or ‘soul’.
  3. luminious:full of or shedding light
  4. vacuous:having or showing a lack of thought or intelligence; mindless
  5. arden: enthusiastic or passionate.
  6. venerable: accorded a great deal of respect, especially because of age, wisdom, or character.
  7. invocation:the summoning of a deity or the supernatural.
  8. penitent:feeling or showing sorrow and regret for having done wrong; repentant
  9. incessant: (of something regarded as unpleasant) continuing without pause or interruption
  10. protrude:extend beyond or above a surface.
  11. ascetics:a person who practices severe self-discipline and abstention
  12. jackal: a small carnivorous mammal of the genus Canis, which also includes the wolf, dog, and coyote.
  13. Bast: Bast may refer to Bast, or Bastet, a goddess in Ancient Egyptian mythology; fibre or skin fibre is plant fibre collected from the phloem (the “inner bark” or the skin)
  14. Semana:a state of bliss-When the unmana sakti begins to display herself in the form of the universe with sunya and ending with earth, then descending from the highest state of Pramata (knowing Self), she is known as Samana in as much as she has started the mentation of all that is thinkable

Mini Lesson

  1. Discuss Q2 based on the passage on page 10.
  2. About Brahman, Brahmin and Brahma have different meanings. Brahman refers to the Supreme Self. Brahmin (or Brahmana) refers to an individual belonging to the Hindu priest, artists, teachers, technicians class (varna or pillar of the society) and also to an individual belonging to the Brahmin tribe/caste into which they are born; while the word Brahma refers to the creative aspect of the universal consciousness or God
  3. Focus on images that seem to convey the essence of Hinduism such as fid tree, moon light etc.
  4. Focus on Siddhartha’s character: How is his character portrayed?
  5. We’ll read the 1st paragraph on page 2 and discuss ou r1st impression of Siddhartha.
  6. We’ll read paragraphs 5-8 ( page 3-5) and  discuss what his “thirst” and ” sufferings” are.

Your Turn to Practice:

From the 9th paragraph on till the end of the chapter , how does Saddhartha show his determination ?

Homework:  1. Write a paragraph responding to the question: what is Saddhartha thirsty for and  why is he suffering? Your topic sentence should be a direct answer to the questions. In the body paragraph, use evudence to support your assertion.

2. Read and annotate chapter 2 of Siddhartha.

Lesson 2

Session 1  Writing

Objectives: Students will delve deeper into chapter 1 of Siddhatha to examine the causes of his discontent and sufferings.

Aim; What cause Siddhartha’s discontent and sufferings?

Do Now: Use a couple of sentences to describe Siddhatha’s  life including his relationships with his family members.

Mini Lesson

  1. Share the Do Now response, which is the context of the analysis.
  2. Respond: What cause Siddhartha’s discontent and sufferings?
  3. Modeling:
    In paragrpah 5 on page 3, the author uses contrasting imagery to show a discordant state of mind Siddhartha  is in( central idea).  (context) While his life is situated in a “rose path” (direct quotation of the 1st imager) of serene fig garden, and he contemplates, receives his ablution and sacarices in the shade of mango forest( paraphase the 1st imagery) , yet the “restless thoughts and dreams”( 2nd direct quotation)  crept on him through the river, star and  the sun beam(paraphrase 2nd imagery). Siddhartha’s heart seems to have been gripped by a natural force he can barely control and is in total discord with his life( analysis) , as portrayed by his body walking in the ” rose garden” but his soul infused “drop by drop” a sense of restlessness.  He finds no happiness in himeself( so what).

Your Turn to Practice

Follow the format of the model writing and analyze the assigned paragrpah. Your topic sentence is your response the question posted. Be sure to use all the necessay ingredients in the paragraph.

Group 1: Work on parapgraph 6( page 4)- What torments Siddhatha? How does he know he is discontent? How does he find out what he wants to know?

Group 2  : Paragraph 7 ( page 4,5) – What does Siddhatha discover that he needs to do to quench his “thirst”?

End of the Lesson Assessment: Each group presents the paragraph.

Homework:  Organize all three paragraphs together in an essay form.  Add an introduction by  combining the responses to the questions to help you formulate a thesis.

 Session 2 Reading Chapter 2: Siddhartha

Objectives: Students will discuss whether Siddhartha’s quest of Nirva is egocentrically antisocial.

Aim; Is it possible for a person to be self-sufficing? Why or why not?

Do Now:  Make a list of major things Siddhartha has done in this chapter to seek enlightenment. What is the result?

Mini Lesson

Teacher leads the discussion in class and students will use their homework assigments to particiapte in the discussion-

  1. Siddhartha’s goal is to conquer the self. Explain what it means.
  2. What do you think is the reason  for the attempt to capture the archetype of life in meditation?
  3. What tricks does Siddhartha try to lose himself?
  4. How do Siddhartha find out the world is an illusion? What do you think is the source of such a view as echoed by a British postmodernist Angela Carter, ” Is not this world an illusion? And yet it fools everybody.”
  5. What is the reality these holy men seek?
  6. What is Nirvana?
  7. IS CONQUERING SELF BY BECOMING empty of all thoughts, will, desire a “nay saying” attitude toward life? Aristole  writes that such isolation is unnatural to man: “The proof that the state is a creation of nature and prior to the individual is that the individual, when isolated, is not self-sufficing; and therefore he is like a part in relation to the whole. But he who is unable to live in society, or who has no need because he is sufficientfor himself, must be either a beast or a god: he is no part of a state. A social instinct is implanted in all men by nature, and yet he who first founded the state was the greatest of benefactors. For man, when perfected, is the best of animals, but, when separated from law and justice, he is the worst of all; since armed injustice is the more dangerous, and he is equipped at birth with arms, meant to be used by intelligence and virtue, which he may use for the worst ends.“( Part II, Book 1 Politics  Aristotle)

Homework: From Siddhartha’s point of view, how would he respond to Aristotle’s view that such totla isolation is unnatural to man.

Read and annotate chapter 3. Be preapred to respond to questions on page 23-24, as well as questions on page 33.

Lesson 3

Session 1 : Writing

Objectives: Students will compare the two opposing views on life, one pursued by Siddhartha and the other espoused by Aristotle, the East and West ideas of living and pursuing fulfillment.

Aim: How do the East and West ideas of self-fulfillment converge somewhere or are they the total opposites?

Do Now: Share your paragraph of analysis with the group and select the best ideas to share with the class.

Mini Lesson

1. What is the essence of Nirvana according to Siddahtha? FInd a quotation fromthe text to support your response.

2. Interpret Aritotle’s view: IS CONQUERING SELF BY BECOMING empty of all thoughts, will, desire a “nay saying” attitude toward life? Aristole  writes that such isolation is unnatural to man: “The proof that the state is a creation of nature and prior to the individual is that the individual, when isolated, is not self-sufficing; and therefore he is like a part in relation to the whole. But he who is unable to live in society, or who has no need because he is sufficientfor himself, must be either a beast or a god: he is no part of a state. A social instinct is implanted in all men by nature, and yet he who first founded the state was the greatest of benefactors. For man, when perfected, is the best of animals, but, when separated from law and justice, he is the worst of all; since armed injustice is the more dangerous, and he is equipped at birth with arms, meant to be used by intelligence and virtue, which he may use for the worst ends.“( Part II, Book 1 Politics  Aristotle)

Your Turn to Practice:

Take a position on one of the views and give your reasons. Support your position with  a historical or scientic or mathmatical example you have studied. Refute the opposing view by pointing out the limitations of the evidence the view is based on.

Homework: Finish the paragraph of argument.

Session 2 Reading

Objectives: Students will analyze what Siddhatha mean by stating that the Buddha gave him “Siddhatha himself”.

Aim: What does Siddahtha learn from his talks with the Buddha?

Do now: Do a read aloud. Share a quotation from chapter 3 that means deeply or puzzles you. State the page number. No need to explain the meaning.

Mini Lesson

1. Meaning comes from descriptions.

How is the Buddha described physically? How does the description of him strike you? Is this your expected image of a Buddha, why or why not?

2. According to the Buddha, what does his teaching help people?  What is the essence of his teaching according to Siddhatha?

3. How does Siddhtha question the Buddha? What does he find out about himself from questioning? Why can’t Siddartha seek refuge  in the exalted one?

Your Turn to Practice:

1. Let’s share some questions you may have.

2. Although Siddahtha’s story is that of a youngman’s journey to seeking his destiny, in what ways can we all see ourselves in Siddhatha’s doubts, questioning, discontent and questioning authority, etc?

Homework: Read and annotate Chaper 4 and answer questions on pages 34-35.

Respond: Is the finding of “inner-self” consequently seen as a a wholly personal undertaking? Explain.

Lesson 4

Session 1 Writing

Objectives: Students will debate over the topic of self- fulfillment in an Eastern philosophy sense and Western one.

Aim: How does the environment( exterior world)  affect people’s perceptions of themselves?

Resource: About logo, ethos, pathos

Do Now:

  1. Share revision of the analysis paragraph.
  2. Review the argument essays on Arnold’s views on heroes.

Mini Lesson

Your Turn to PRACTICE

Share the argument paragraph. Is there any case of logical fallacy in your partner’s paragraph? How does s/he provide the reasoning for his /her point?

Homework: Select one logical fallacy cartoon and print it out ( use markers to color the cartoon). Add your captions by explaining what logical fallacy it reveals and how we can avoid falling into such a logical stumble  in our argument or speech.

Session 2  Reading Chapter 4 Siddhartha “Awakening”

Objectives: Students will ananlyze one of the major change in Siddhartha after he finds “Siddhartha” again.

Aim: How has the world changed in Siddhartha’s eyes after he departed from the Buddha?

Do now: In the  context of the chpater, what  is the difference between ” my self” and “myself”? Doe he make sense when he says he tried to ” free my self” from ‘ myself”? Why?

Mini Lesson

Read aloud –

  1. Round 1: share the imagery the author uses to describe the “new” physical world Siddhartha now sees after he has awakend.
  2. Round 2: Share the new thoughts Siddhartha has gained about himself.
  3. Round 3: Share Siddhartha’s new perception of the world surrounding him.
  4. Round 3: Share Siddhartha’s feelings about the new discovery about himself and the world.

Your Turn to Practice:

What does the  metaphor snake suggest in this chapter? In which category does the meaning of the metaphor fit? Why?

Homework: 

  1. Read and annotate chapter 5. Create a glossary for the chapter.
  2. What’s the central idea of chapter 5? Write a couple of sentences to state the point. No need to use examples at this moment.

Lesson 5

Session 1 Writing

Objectivces: Students will select two quotations from each chapter of Siddhartha to read closely and interpret them.

Aim: In each chapter, what are the statements that represent the essence of the story?

Agenda

  1.  Mini Lesson: How to interpret a quotation?
  2.  Conferencing
  3.  During individual conferences, students work on interpreting self-selected quotations frome ach chapter or illustrating a logical fallacy.
  4. Share the argument pararaph based on Lesson 3.

Homework: Prepare for Siddhartha portfolio.

Session 2 :Reading

Objectives: Students will analyze what Siddhartha has learned from his worldly experiences.

Aim: Why does the chapter begin with such rich descriptions of the world Siddhartha sees?

Do Now: What does Siddhartha mean by ” the random self of the senses”?

Mini Lesson

  1. How does Siddhatha show his newly gained perception of the world?
  2. What’s the significance of Siddhartha’s dreams?
  3. What does SIddhatha mean when he states, ” I can think, I can wait , I can fast”?
  4. How does Siddhatha describe the nature of magic?

Assessment: Respond: How has Siddartha discovered more about him self through worldly experiences?

Homework: Interpret Davis Hume’s passage on page 56 about the nature of self.

Lesson 6

Session 1 Writing

Objectives:Students will gain deep understanding of the concept “self” through reading David Hume’s essay.

Aim: What is self according to Hume? How do we discover the “self” according to him?

Do Now: Take a position on one of the views and give your reasons. Support your position with  a historical or scientific or mathematical example you have studied. Refute the opposing view by pointing out the limitations of the evidence the view is based on.

Mini Lesson:

As a class, discuss Hume’s ideas about “self”. Read the excerpt from David Hume’s Personal  Identity from A Treatise from Human Nature.

“For from what impression cou’d this idea be deriv’d? This question ’tis impossible to answer without a manifest contradiction and absurdity; and yet ’tis a question, which must necessarily be answer’d, if we wou’d have the idea of self pass for clear and intelligible. It must be some one impression, that gives rise to every real idea. But self or person is not any one impression, but that to which our several impressions and ideas are suppos’d to have a reference. If any impression gives rise to the idea of self, that impression must continue invariably the same, thro’ the whole course of our lives; since self is suppos’d to exist after that manner. But there is no impression constant and invariable. Pain and pleasure, grief and joy, passions and sensations succeed each other, and never all exist at the same time. It cannot, therefore, be from any of these impressions, or from any other, that the idea of self is deriv’d; and consequently there is no such idea.

 But farther, what must become of all our particular perceptions upon this hypothesis? All these are different, and distinguishable, and separable from each other, and may be separately consider’d, and may exist separately, and have no need of any thing to support their existence. After what manner, therefore, do they belong to self; and how are they connected with it? For my part, when I enter most intimately into what I call myself, I always stumble on some particular perception or other, of heat or cold, light or shade, love or hatred, pain or pleasure. I never can catch myself at any time without a perception, and never can observe any thing but the perception. When my perceptions are remov’d for any time, as by sound sleep; so long am I insensible ofmyself, and may truly be said not to exist. And were all my perceptions remov’d by death, and cou’d I neither think, nor feel, nor see, nor love, nor hate after the dissolution of my body, I shou’d be entirely annihilated, nor do I conceive what is farther requisite to make me a perfect non-entity. If any one, upon serious and unprejudic’d reflection thinks he has a different notion of himself, I must confess I can reason no longer with him. All I can allow him is, that he may be in the right as well as I, and that we are essentially different in this particular. He may, perhaps, perceive something simple and continu’d, which he callshimself; tho’ I am certain there is no such principle in me.”

Now discuss the following questions:

  1. What’s the most important concept in the passage?
  2. What are the words repeated ? Are they key to the understanding of this passage?
  3. What’s this passage about? Use one sentence to describe the central idea.

Your Turn to Practice Read a student’s responses to Hume’s views on “self” and respond.

Homework: Use evidence and the analysis of the evidence to show how you derived at the central idea about self as discussed in the passage.

Session 2  Reading

Objectivces: Students will analyze the meaning of inner sanctury that separates Siddhartha from the childlike people.

Aim: What is the nature of inner sancturay that Siddhartha and Kamala have and the childlike people? Is the inner sancturay our “self”? Why or why not?

Mini Lesson

Use the following words to retell the story of chapter 6 by making a sentence with them or repeating the original sentences that contain the words-

  1. destitute
  2. voluntarily
  3. I can think, I can wait. I can fast.
  4. Suservient
  5. game
  6. plunge
  7. equanimity
  8. Nothing was ever achived by scolding.
  9. Futile
  10. I haven’t learned to think from you.
  11. He saw mankind going through life in a childlike or animal like manner…
  12. …and this entire game and the passion with which all people played this game occupied his thoughts just as much as the gods and Brahmans used to occupy them.
  13. …became aware of the strange life he was leading… real life still passing him by and not touching him.
  14. ..his source ran away from him, ran and ran invisibly, had nothing to do with his life any more.
  15. scared
  16. ” falling leaf” vs “fixed star”
  17. …there is a peace and refuge, to which  you can go every hour of th day and be at home with yourself

Your Turn to Pratice:

What is the central idea of the chapter? What has Siddharthat discovered about himself?

Homework: Read and annotate chpater 7. Answer the questions on pages 69-70.

Lesson 7

Session 1 Writing

Objectives: Students will write a paragrpah of analysis on the passage about self by Davd Hume.

Aim: What is “self “according to Hume? How do we discover the “self” according to him?

Do Now: Collect the argument paragraph.

Mini Lesson

  1. What is the passage about?
  2. Which key words or phrases have you observed?
  3. Which literary device stands out the most for you? Why? An example?
  4. What questions do you have about the passage?

Your Turn to Practice

  1. Based on our discussion, revise the central idea you have generated as homework by making it precise and relevant.
  2. List two-three examples of literary devices. How are the devices used convey or emphasize the central idea?
  3. Which words or lines  should you quote to make your point clearer?
  4. Which idea(s) do you need to paraphase so you can provide the necessay context for the evidence?

Assessment: In the paragraph, complete the contral idea and it two supporting evidence.

Homework: Complete the analysis paragraph ( should be one full page typed at least. Font size should be 12).

Session 2  Reading

Objectives: Students will evaluate Siddhartha’s self analysis to help them understand why he finally leaves his “mango tree” and ‘pleasure garden”.

Aim: What makes Siddhartha finally abandon the “game” life he has been living, which has helped him expereince riches, lust, sloth, power and greed?

Do Now:  As a class, we’ll finish the discussion about the textual details from Chapter 6. What does each detail mean and reveal?

  1. He saw mankind going through life in a childlike or animal like manner…
  2. …and this entire game and the passion with which all people played this game occupied his thoughts just as much as the gods and Brahmans used to occupy them.
  3. …became aware of the strange life he was leading… real life still passing him by and not touching him.
  4. ..his source ran away from him, ran and ran invisibly, had nothing to do with his life any more.
  5. scared
  6. ” falling leaf” vs “fixed star”
  7. …there is a peace and refuge, to which  you can go every hour of th day and be at home with yourself

Mini Lesson

  1. At this point of the book, Siddhartha’s life seems to have gone through a complete cycle. Draw a circle to show the starting point of his journey, his various expereinces and awakenings, and finally his abandonment of all his possessions.
  2. Share the “circle”. Do we all have the same list of events? Why did we  select  different details to illustrate Siddhartha’s life journey?
  3. In this chapter, Siddhartha reflects on his life and the true meaing of it. How do we know he never totally lost that inward voice?
  4. While so many things are taking place in the chapter, which detail stands to you the most? Why?
  5. What is the nature of Siddhartha’s “inward voice”? Does he ever lose it?
  6. How has Siddhartha’s dream os seeking enlightenment faded away?
  7. Although he has been living a life of child-like people seeking worldly pleasures, yet she still feels different from the others. Why does he watch them with “disdain and mockery”? How does his attitude reveal his inner world?
  8. In the meantime, while mocking the childlike people, he still envies them? Why?
  9. What are the biggest changes according to your observation of Siddhartha’s behavior and attitude?
  10. What does his physical transformation symbolize?
  11. What does the dead bird in Siddhartha’s dream symbolize?
  12. How is the metaphor “thirst” used to show Siddhartha’s loss of inspiration?
  13. Finally, what has helped Siddhartha realize that the game he has been living for is Sansara?

Your Turn to Practice

There are many literary devices used in this chapter, how does Hesse describe Siddartha’s struggle and his contradictory emotions toward people?  How does the struggle finally lead to Siddhartha’s second awakening? Only this time he is awaken not to sensory pleasures but his destiny.

Homework: Read and annotate Chapter 8. Respond to questions 1-4 on pages 79-80.

 Lesson 8

Session 1: Writing

Objectives: Students will read closely a passage in Chapter 8 and analyze how Hesse uses diction to reveal the ‘self” Siddhartah sees in him after he left his riches and home.

Aim: How does Hesse portray Siddhartha in the passage from the beginning of chapter 8 ( page 80) to the end of the 2nd paragraph on page 83?

Resources: Hinduism Reincarnation wheel

Do Now:

1.Go over the contextual part of the analysis paragraph as revealed in student writing.

2. Grammar in PSAT

Skill Focus:

  1. Read the passage from the beginning of chapter 8 ( page 80) to the end of the 2nd paragraph on page 83 and highlight the details that describe Sidhhartha’s perception of “self”.
  2. Examine closely the words used. How would you describe Siddhartha’s various but distictive emotions Hesse portrays for his readers? What is the tone implied?
  3. Is Siddhartha’s suicidal attempt a surprise? Why or why not?

Practice:

Write a paragraph in which you analyze how Hesse uses a specific literary element or technique to reveal in this passage Siddhartha’s “self”. Be sure to select three  examples to make your point clear.

Homework: Finish the paragraph of analysis.

Session 2 Reading

Objectives: Students will examine Siddhartha’s retrospective reflections on his distastful past and his present happy state of mind  and discuss how such a drastic psychological and philosophical transformation is possible.

Aim: How does Siddhartha enable to recover from his despair? How does this psychological and philosophical transformation occur?

Do now:

Select details from the passage on page 82 from ” deep was his sleep to ..stragely awake, joyful and curious” to indicate his drastically transformed state of being.

Mini  Lesson: Investigating textual meanings-

  1. Why does Siddhartha say he is “on pilgrmiage”? Is he sincere? Why or why not?
  2. Why does Govinda treat Siddhartha as a gentleman who still owns the riches when he bids Siddhartha farewell?
  3. On page 85, in the pararaph beginning with “with a smiling face”, what does Siddhartha mean by “enchantment”?
  4. What are the “feats” Siddhartha has lost in the years when he pursued a worldly life?
  5. On page 86, in the paragraph beginning with ” Now he thought…”, what makes Siddhartha feel “wonderous”? How does such revelation confirm that the “old Siddhartha is dead”?
  6. On page 86, from the last paragraph beginning with ” Wonderous indeed was my life ” to  ” Wonderfully, he felt joy rolling like waves in his chest” , how Siddhartha evaluate his own past? What conclusion has he drawn from the retrospective thoughts?
  7. In the last two paragraphs of page 87, what type of sentence structure ( syntax) have you noticed in the two sentences, one of which begins with ” How did I hate this world of the riches… have made myself old and evil” and the other ” He had now , so he felt… a piece of misery”?
  8. What is the difference between ” know” and “experience” (page 88) as used in the text?
  9. On page 88 in the paragraph beginning with ” For a long time…”, what type of rhetorical device is used in the  sentence of ” Was this not his self, his small ,…felt fear?” What does “it” refer to (antecedent) as used in the sentence ” Was it not due to his death…”( page 88)?
  10. In the last paragraph on page 88, what type of sentence structure is used to emphasize the meaning of “too much knowledge” and “arragance”?
  11. On page 89, do you agree with the idea expressed in the first parapgrah? Why?
  12. What may be the symbolic meaning of ” river and bird” respectively?

Practice and Assess:

Respond to the question: How does Siddhartha enable to recover from his despair? How does this psychological and philosophical transforamtion occur?

Homework: Read and annotate chapter 9.

Lesson 9

Session 1 Writing

Objectives: Students will read the detailed descriptions of the river in Chapter 9 “The Ferryman” and analyze its symbolic meaning .

Aim: What does the river symbolIze and why?

Do Now: Share and peer review our anaysis of the previous chapter about Siddhartha’s perception of “self” when he first reaches the river.

Use the checklist-

  1. Topic sentence states how Hesse uses diction to convey an idea or tone that reveals Siddhartha’s ever decreasing perception of ” self” .
  2. Context 1
  3. Cite a cluster ( strand) of details that are grouped by a pattern( certain type of diction). Explain, analyze the pattern and interpret its meaning.
  4. Context 2
  5. Cite a cluster ( strand) of details that are selected by a pattern ( binary?) . Explain analyze the pattern and interpret its meaning.
  6. Context 3
  7. Cite a cluster ( strand) of details that are selected by a pattern (repetition)  . Explain analyze the pattern and interpret its meaning.
  8. So What- wrap up all the examples together, what’s the pattern? Is certain emotion becoming more intense? Noticing all the details, what do you notice about the underlining tone ? How does the tone reveal about Siddhartha’s perception of “self”?

Here is a model paragraph that I have written based on the passage. Read carefully to understand the elements of a text-based analysis:

Hesse uses diction to depict Siddhartha’s downward spiraling state of mind to the point of self-annihilation before he discovers there is still hope(Topic Sentence-central idea). After Siddhartha leaves his child-like life behind and resumes his “pilgrimage”, he stops at the bank of a river feeling weakened and empty (context 1). In the beginning of the passage, Hesse uses diction that connotes strong emotional turmoil, and psychological despondency as shown in his depicting Siddhartha as “ desolate”, feeling  ‘let go”  and “frightening emptiness” in his soul ( example 1 and analysis).  Siddhartha stands by the river looking at his reflection but seeing not his “self”( context 2) . Hesse continues to reveal Siddhartha’s  self-denial and feelings of worthlessness  by using  invective such as “ food for fish,” “this dog Siddhartha”, “this lunatic” and “depraved and rotten body” , which vividly portrays and deeply reveals  Siddhartha’s self-perception that he is no better that a fish( lowest form of life), and a miserable captive to the material world and his body is nothing else but a decaying and empty shell ( example 2 and analysis) . Siddhartha feels life is weary and meaningless and cannot seek his way out of this conundrum. What use is this body if the soul is gone?( context 3) He attempts to drown himself when he hears the “Om” sound, which is a prayer that means “perfect” and “ completion” . The holy noise sounds “old” and “slurred” but nevertheless distinctively audible as confirmed by the description that “ the sound ‘Om’ touched Siddhartha’s ear”. Hesse uses the device of synesthesia ( cross-senses diction)  , “sound…touched…ear”, to suggest an invisible holy presence, Siddhartha’s own soul that  he still has and is resurfacing. He is shocked by this discovery but relieved to realize that his spirit has merely been buried in his miseries but not lost ( example 3 and analysis) . From feeling desperate to “forsaken”, Siddhartha almost reaches the end of his life. The tone of hopelessness shifts to an more optimistic note when his murky “self” resurfaces by  the call of a holy prayer “ Om”, which suggests Siddhartha’s soul has merely been dormant but not lost. Hesse foreshadows that Siddhartha will in no time return to his path to enlightenment. ( So What)

New Skill Focus: Symbolism 

Select three quotations from chapter 9 that describe the river. What does each quotation mean? What is the connection of the three quotations? What do they tell you about the theme of the novella? How does the river play the ultimate role of helping Siddhatha gain his enlightenment?

  • “Most of all, he learned from it to listen, to pay close attention with a quiet heart, with a waiting, opened soul, without passion, without a wish, without judgement, without an opinion.” ( page 96)
  • “…that the river is everywhere at once, at the source and at the mouth, at the waterfall, at the ferry, at the rapids, in the sea, in the mountains, everywhere at once, and that there is only the present time for it, not the shadow of the past,
    not the shadow of the future?”( page 96)
  • when the river had just increased its flow in the rainy season and made a powerful noise, then said Siddhartha: “Isn’t it so, oh friend, the river has many voices, very many voices? Hasn’t it the voice of a king, and of a warrior, and of a bull, and of a bird of the night, and of a woman giving birth, and of a sighing man, and a thousand other voices more?” (97)
  • “all voices of the creatures are in its voice.”
  • listened to the water, which was no water to them, but the voice of life, the voice of what exists, of what is eternally taking shape. (98)
  • “I (Siddhartha) was listening to the river. A lot it has told me, deeply it has filled me with the healing thought, with the thought of oneness.”( 102)

Discuss the meaning of the following statements that reveal the essence of enlightenment concept-

  1. …the feeling of this both being present and at the same time real, the feeling of eternity, completely filled every aspect of his being. Deeply he (Siddhartha)  felt, more deeply than ever before, in this hour, the indestructibility of every life, the eternity of every moment.(102)
  2. “You’ve experienced suffering, Siddhartha, but I see: no sadness has entered
    your heart.”(102)

Homework: Select two quotations about the river. Analyze each quotation before you connect the meaning of both quotations to construct your understanding of the symbolic meaning of the river.

Essay Assignment Due 11/05 (refer to the exemplary essay on Mark Twain’s writing)

Text-Analysis Response Your Task: Closely read Chapter 9 of Siddhartha and write a well-developed, text-based response of 5 paragraphs. In your response, identify a central idea in the text and analyze how the author’s use of  symbolism develops this central idea. Use strong and thorough evidence from the text to support your analysis. Do not simply summarize the text. Guidelines:Be sure to

  • Identify a central idea in the text
  • Analyze how the author’s use of symbolism develops this central idea.
  • Use strong and thorough evidence from the text to support your analysis
  • Organize your ideas in a cohesive and coherent manner
  • Maintain a formal style of writing
  • Follow the conventions of standard written
Here is an outline of the essay Introduction: ( 4 sentences) 

  1. State the literary technique ( symbolism) that the author uses to discuss the key topic ( of your analysis- your choice of the topic)
  2. State the central idea you have identified based on the chapter
  3. Explain( elaborate) the central idea to establish the criteria for your in-depth analysis
  4. State how the author develops the central idea ( there are at least 2 parts)

 Body Paragraphs

  1. Describe two examples-
    • Provide a context for your analysis ( descriptions)
    • Introduce example#1 ( paraphrase or quote ) to illustrate the part 1 “how”, i.e. use of binary details
    • Introduce example#2 to illustrate the part 2 “how”, i.e. direct quote of key words
    • So what ( based on both examples)
  2. Analyze: why do the two examples you have provided above support your central idea you have claimed in the introduction? ( making a connection )
  3. Introduce a third example to support your central idea

 Conclusion: So What based on all evidence

Session 2 Reading

Objectives: Students will analyze why the ferryman has become Siddhatha’s “teacher” leading his way to enlightenment.

Aim: How does the ferryman become his last teacher that will lead Siddhartha to his enlightement?

Do Now:  How is the ferryman depicted physically?

Mini Lesson

A. In small groups, we’ll discuss: How does the extended metaphor, the river, serve as the motif of the chapter?

  1. How is the river described?
  2. How does the ferryman describe it?
  3. How does Siddhartha describe it?
  4. How does the river serve as a link of the two characters?
  5. How is the river described as holy and sacred?
  6. What is the meaning of ” The more thing change, the more things say the same”?

B. Share our responses.

C. Raise your questions about the chapter.

Assessment: What has the river teach Siddhartha about the ultimate truth about life?

Homework:  Read and annotate chapater 10.

 Lesson 10

Session 1 Writing

Objectives: Students will use the checklist to revise their 1st draft of the text analysis of chapter 9

Aim: How do we use various documentation ( not only direct quotations)  in writing a text-analysis response?

Do Now: Students raise major issue about writing the essay.

Mini Lesson: Task and Checklist

We’ll use the checklist below to revise the response. Be sure to label each part in your writing. Raise questions if you have any.

Text-Analysis Response Your Task: Closely read Chapter 9 of Siddhartha and write a well-developed, text-based response of 5 paragraphs. In your response, identify a central idea in the text and analyze how the author’s use of  symbolism develops this central idea. Use strong and thorough evidence from the text to support your analysis. Do not simply summarize the text. Guidelines:Be sure to

  • Identify a central idea in the text
  • Analyze how the author’s use of symbolism develops this central idea.
  • Use strong and thorough evidence from the text to support your analysis
  • Organize your ideas in a cohesive and coherent manner
  • Maintain a formal style of writing
  • Follow the conventions of standard written
Here is an outline of the essay Introduction: ( 4 sentences) 

  1. State the literary technique ( symbolism) that the author uses to discuss the key topic ( of your analysis- your choice of the topic)
  2. State the central idea you have identified based on the chapter
  3. Explain( elaborate) the central idea to establish the criteria for your in-depth analysis
  4. State how the author develops the central idea ( there are at least 2 parts)

 Body Paragraphs

  1. Describe two examples-
    • Provide a context for your analysis ( descriptions)
    • Introduce example#1 ( paraphrase or quote ) to illustrate the part 1 “how”, i.e. use of binary details
    • Introduce example#2 to illustrate the part 2 “how”, i.e. direct quote of key words
    • So what ( based on both examples)
  2. Analyze: why do the two examples you have provided above support your central idea you have claimed in the introduction? ( making a connection )
  3. Introduce a third example to support your central idea

 Conclusion: So What based on all evidence

Homework: Revise the essay and the 2nd draft is due on Thursday.

Session 2 Reading

Objectives: Students will gain understanding how Siddhartha is becoming complete by his unconditioned love for his son.

Aim: How does his love for his son complete his journey in the world?

Do Now: Describe how his son treats Siddhartha and his reactions to the treatment.

Teaching Point

Analyze Siddhartha’s character through his love for his own son-

Up to this moment, Siddhartha has always been detached, which makes him envious of child-like people. Now he is fully committed to his taking care of his son no matter what.

  • What do you think of his parenting style? Would he be able to help his son eventually? Why or why not?
  • Why couldn’t Siddhartha punish his son but simply sit and wait?
  • How does his love for his son complete his human experience? How may the experience help him achieve enlightenment?
  • What is the central idea of the chapter?
  • What are some of the statements in this chapter you strongly agree? disagree?
  • What’s you reaction to Siddhartha’s son’s behavior and his attitude toward his father? ( cite evidence to show his attitude)

Quick Write:  Whose side are you on? Should Siddhartha keep his son till he finds his own path? Should the son rebel to gain his right to pursue his path?

Homework: Read and annotate chapter 11.

Lesson 11

Session 1: Writing

Objectives: Students will use the essay checklist and class discussions to revise their essay.

Aim: How can I make my central ideas precise and evidence relevant?

Do Now: Read out loud your central idea and explanation of its meaning.

Mini Lesson

How to make an idea evolve?

  1. Copy the quotations from which you have selected the details.
  2. Copy the details and examples you have used to  support your central idea on a clean sheet of paper.
  3. Exchange the sheet with your partner. What’s the connection among the details or examples? Write it down. Is the central idea being developed by these details or examples? ( through repetition, antithesis or a logical reasoning)
  4. Select an example of analysis and copy on the same sheet of paper.
  5. How many sentences have I written to analyze the example or details ( at least 2)?
  6. Let’s listen to the analysis.

Your Turn to Practice

Exchange your essay drafts and use the checklist to make comments .

Homework: Revise the essay and hand in your 3rd draft( final) tomorrow.

Session 2 Reading

Objectives: Students will describe and infer the state of enlightenment.

Aim: How has Siddhartha changed? What are his newly gained perspectives toward life and people?

Do now: Find one word that describes the new view Siddhartha has gained about life and people.

Teaching Point:

  1. Describe at least three changes that Siddhartha has been through in this chapter. Quote directly from the text to support your ideas.
  2. Share the quotations that indicate or describe the state of enlightenment.

Your Turn to Practice:

Select one quotation from the chapter that stands out the most to you. Interpret its meaning and explain how you derive at the interpretation. How does it relate to the central theme of the chapter?

Homework: Read and annotate chapter 12.

Lesson 12

Session 1: Writing

Workshop and Conferences

Homework: The final draft ( draft #4) is due on Monday 11/10.

Session 2: Reading( Chapter 12)

Objectives: Students will analyze the meaning of Enlightenment in the Buddhist sense.

Aim: What wisdom does Siddhartha share with Govinda? Why does this indicate he has reached the enlightenment?

Do Now: Interpret:

When Siddhartha hears the many voices of the river as Om, he is also affirming Schopenhauer’s recognition that ” All the cruelty and torments of which the world is full in fact merely necessary result of the totality of the former under which the will to live is objectified.”

Teaching Points:

A. Read out loud the 3rd paragraph beginning g with ” Listen well, my dear…” to ” …which have come to my mind”.

What is the central idea of this passage?

B. Share a quotation from the chapter with the class about which you have a question.

C. RESPOND TO THE FOLLOWING QUESTIONS:

  1. Why is enlightenment not possible when seeking becomes a goal-in-itself for Govinda
  2. What wisdom does Siddhartha share with Govinda? Why does each wisdom make sense or no sense to you?
  3. Where and how has Siddhartha gained his wisdom?
  4. How does Gonvida know Siddhartha has reached enlightenment? Are you convinced Hardhearted has reached enlightenment? Why or why not?

Your Turn to PRACTICE

Arnold Toynbee indicates that the quest fro enlightenment or Nirvana is an egocentric quest: ( Siddhartha page 138 )

Read “Love’s way of dealing with us is different from conscience’s way…”

What kind of love characterized by Toynbee is it that Siddhartha says was a necessary condition for his enlightenment? Second, do you think Toynbee is mistaken that is the desire for Nirvana is not ” the kind of desire that takes us out of ourselves and carries us beyond ourselves”?

Homework: Complete your portfolio for Siddhartha and bring it in on Monday. I expect to see chapter by chapter-

  1. responses to questions
  2. glossary
  3. quotations and interpretations

Other written responses I have assigned you should also be included in the right chapter.

Lesson 13

Session 1: Writing

Objectives: Students will reflect on the Siddhartha unit and write a tercet /triad poem as their reflections.

Aim:  What worked in this unit and what areas do I need to improve so I can do better in the next unit?

Do Now: Exchange the final draft of your Symbolism essays and use the rubric to score your partner’s essay.

Activities:

  1. Make a list of areas you have done well in the Siddhartha unit- skills you have learned, reading  or writing assignments you have enjoyed ; vocabulary and philosophy you have learned, etc
  2. Make a list of areas you feel you could have done better- skills, work habits, or time management etc.
  3. Write a tercet ( Terza Rima) or triad poem as a preface to your portfolio. The poem is supposed to reflect your self-assessment of the unit.

Homework: Finish the terza rima poem or triad poem as well as Reflection on Unit 2 Siddhartha

Self Reflection

A.What I have learned

B. What I’m proud of…

C. Areas I’ll Need to Improve ( be specific)

Session 2 Reading

Objectives: Students will analyze the meaning of Enlightenment in the Buddhist sense.

Aim: What wisdom does Siddhartha share with Govinda? Why does this indicate he has reached the enlightenment?

Do Now: Share a quotation and its interpretation from your portfolio.

Teaching Points:

A. Read out loud the 3rd paragraph beginning g with ” Listen well, my dear…” to ” …which have come to my mind”.

What is the central idea of this passage?

B. Share a quotation from the chapter with the class about which you have a question.

C. RESPOND TO THE FOLLOWING QUESTIONS:

  1. Why is enlightenment not possible when seeking becomes a goal-in-itself for Govinda
  2. What wisdom does Siddhartha share with Govinda? Why does each wisdom make sense or no sense to you?
  3. Where and how has Siddhartha gained his wisdom?
  4. How does Gonvida know Siddhartha has reached enlightenment? Are you convinced Hardhearted has reached enlightenment? Why or why not?

Your Turn to PRACTICE

Arnold Toynbee indicates that the quest fro enlightenment or Nirvana is an egocentric quest: ( Siddhartha page 138 )

Read “Love’s way of dealing with us is different from conscience’s way…”

What kind of love characterized by Toynbee is it that Siddhartha says was a necessary condition for his enlightenment? Second, do you think Toynbee is mistaken that is the desire for Nirvana is not ” the kind of desire that takes us out of ourselves and carries us beyond ourselves”?

Homework: What is your understanding of enlightenment in Buddhist’s sense? How does this  knowledge help you see life in a new light? Why?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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