Emily Dickinson and Robert Frost

Unit 3

Robert Frost ” Home Burial”

Objectives: Students will analyze how the meter in the poem effects the meaning.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.9-10.1
Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.9-10.2
Determine a central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.

Resources: Dickinson and Frost

 Differentiation:
  • Students select details from various texts  based on their individual reading experience and understanding of the text.
  • They are also given various options to respond to the task depending on their personal level of challenges or strengths.
  • Students can raise their own questions to probe into the implied meaning of the poem.
  • video clips and articles

Grouping Rationale: Students will be grouped based on personal choice with consideration of individual learning needs, styles, talents and personality to maximize their productivity. In each group, all participants are contributors; but they will take turns to be a timer, facilitator, recorder,or presenter.

Do now: Watch a brief Robert Frost bio. Share one interesting detail about the poet.

More info about Robert Frost

Mini Lesson

Blank verse: unrhymed iambic pentameter.

Meter:

  1. Iambic (the noun is iamb or iambus): a lightly stressed syllable followed by a heavily stressed syllable u /
  2.  Trochaic (the noun is trochee): a stressed followed by a light syllable / u
  3.  Anapestic (the noun is anapest): two light syllables followed by a stressed syllable u u /
  4. Dactylic (the noun is dactyl): a stressed syllable followed by two light syllables syllables: / uu
  • If a line has four feet, it is tetrameter.
  • If a line has five feet, it is pentameter.
  • If it has six feet, it is hexameter, and so on.

Listen to a recording of  the poem ” Home Burial”. Pay special attention to the meter and rhythm of the poem.

Teacher Model ( excerpt from shmoop.com)

“Frost breaks up the complete line of iambic pentameter into two lines of dialogue (but he indents the woman’s line, so we’ll be sure to connect the meters together). Squish them together and you get ten syllables. But we definitely don’t have just five stresses in this line.

In the first half, we have three. And then, each instance of the word “don’t” in the second line is a strong stressed syllable, as well as the word “cried.” That makes for eight—count ’em—stresses in one iambic pentameter line.

Why pack in so many stresses? Well, this is one of the most intense and urgent moments in the poem. We have finally found out what’s really coming between this fighting couple, and the poet is packing the meter with stress to show us that these two are under a lot of—you guessed it—stress.

If you’re feeling dramatic, you might try reading this poem aloud with a friend (one can play the woman, the other her husband). This might help you spot the places where Frost is straying from the daDUM rhythm of iambic pentameter. And we think you’ll find that in the places where he’s shaking things up, he’s doing so for a reason. Frost was a metrical master, and he knew how to make meter make meaning.”

Independent Practice

Do you notice any meter or rhythm to the poem? What effect does the meter have on the poem?

Check for Understanding:

Share out your response to the question.

Homework#1: Recreate a “Forming Evidence -Based Claim: in your notebook. Identify examples of meter and make a claim based on your details.

___________________________________________

Lesson 2

Objectives: Students will be able to analyze the situation described in the poem through the imagery that describes physical and emotional landscapes.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.9-10.1
Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.9-10.2
Determine a central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.

Resources: Dickinson and Frost

 Differentiation:
  • Students select details from various texts  based on their individual reading experience and understanding of the text.
  • They are also given various options to respond to the task depending on their personal level of challenges or strengths.
  • Students can raise their own questions to probe into the implied meaning of the poem.
  • video clips and articles

Grouping Rationale: Students will be grouped based on personal choice with consideration of individual learning needs, styles, talents and personality to maximize their productivity. In each group, all participants are contributors; but they will take turns to be a timer, facilitator, recorder,or presenter.

Resource:

Close reading of the poem

Do now: “Forming Evidence -Based Claim: in your notebook. Identify examples of meter and make a claim based on your details.”

Mini Lesson

Closely read the poem-

How does the poet establish the mood and portray the female character int he first stanza?

The poem’s first sentence, “He saw her from the bottom of the stairs / Before she saw him,” implies what the poem very soon states: that, knowing herself seen, she would have acted differently—she has two sorts of behavior, behavior for him to observe and spontaneous immediate behavior: “She was starting down, / Looking back over her shoulder at some fear” says that it is some fear, and not a specific feared object, that she is looking back at; and, normally, we do not look back over our shoulder at what we leave, unless we feel for it something more than fear. “She took a doubtful step” emphasizes the queer attraction or fascination that the fear has for her; her departing step is not sure it should depart. “She took a doubtful step and then undid it “: the surprising use of undid gives her withdrawal of the tentative step a surprising reality. The poem goes on: “To raise herself and look again.” It is a little vertical ballet of indecision toward and away from a fearful but mesmerically attractive object, something hard to decide to leave and easy to decide to return to. “He spoke / Advancing toward her“: having the old line end with “spoke,” the new line begin with “advancing,” makes the very structure of the lines express the way in which he looms up, gets bigger. (Five lines later Frost repeats the effect even more forcibly with: “He said to gain time: ‘What is it you see,’ / Mounting until she cowered under him.“) Now when the man asks: “What is it you see / From up there always—for I want to know,” the word “always” tells us that all this has gone on many times before, and that he has seen it—without speaking of it—a number of times before. The phrase “for I want to know” is a characteristic example of the heavy, willed demands that the man makes, and an even more characteristic example of the repetitive, rhetorical announcements of his actions that he so often makes, as if he felt that the announcement somehow justified or excused the action.

The poem goes on: “She turned and sank upon her skirts at that . . .” The stairs permit her to subside into a modest, compact, feminine bundle; there is a kind of smooth deftness about the phrase, as if it were some feminine saying: “When in straits, sink upon your skirts.” The next line, “And her face changed from terrified to dull,” is an economically elegant way of showing how the terror of surprise (perhaps with another fear underneath it) changes into the dull lack of response that is her regular mask for him. The poem continues: “He said to gain time“—to gain time in which to think of the next thing to say, to gain time in which to get close to her and gain the advantage of his physical nearness, his physical bulk. His next “What is it you see” is the first of his many repetitions; if one knew only this man one would say, “Man is the animal that repeats.” In the poem’s next phrase, “mounting until she cowered under him,” the identity of the vowels in “mounting” and “cowered” physically connects the two, makes his mounting the plain immediate cause of her cowering. “I will find out now” is another of his rhetorical announcements of what he is going to do: “this time you’re going to tell me, I’m ging to make you.” But this heavy-willed compulsion changes into sheer appeal, into reasonable beseeching, in his next phrase: “you must tell me, dear.” The “dear” is affectionate intimacy, the “must” is the “must “of rational necessity; yet the underlying form of the sentence is that of compulsion. The poem goes on: “She, in her place, refused him any help . . .” The separated phrase “in her place” describes and embodies, with economical brilliance, both her physical and spiritual lack of outgoingness, forthcomingness; she brims over none of her contours, remains sitting upon her skirts upon her stairstep, in feminine exclusion. “Refused him any help / With the least stiffening of her neck and silence”: she doesn’t say Yes, doesn’t say No, doesn’t say; her refusal of any answer is worse than almost any answer. “The least stiffening of her neck,” in its concise reserve, its slight precision, is more nearly conclusive than any larger gesture of rejection. He, in extremities, usually repeats some proverbial or rhetorical generalization; at such moments she usually responds either with a particular, specific sentence or else with something more particular than any sentence: with some motion or gesture.

Independent Practice:

Do a close reading activity in a small group.

Text excerpt: 2nd stanza

Check for understanding: Share the claim you have derived form the stanza.

Homework#2: Respond-What physical and emotional landscapes are established in the beginning of the poem? What words help the reader build an image of the setting and the situation? Be sure to support your claim with evidence.

Homework #3: Make a claim to describe the wife, husband, and their relationship respective ( three claims total). Use at least three piece of evidence to back up each claim.

_______________

Lesson 3

Objectives: Students will analyze the central idea of the poem through a rhetorical strategy, setting.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.9-10.1
Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.9-10.2
Determine a central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.

Resources: Dickinson and Frost

 Differentiation:
  • Students select details from various texts  based on their individual reading experience and understanding of the text.
  • They are also given various options to respond to the task depending on their personal level of challenges or strengths.
  • Students can raise their own questions to probe into the implied meaning of the poem.
  • video clips and articles

Grouping Rationale: Students will be grouped based on personal choice with consideration of individual learning needs, styles, talents and personality to maximize their productivity. In each group, all participants are contributors; but they will take turns to be a timer, facilitator, recorder,or presenter.

Resource:

Close reading of the poem

Do Now: Share homework assignments from last night.

Mini Lesson: What is the effect of having the conversation take place on a flight of stairs?

Symbolism- What can a flight of stairs symbolize? Why?

Why does the scene take place at the stairs? Howe does the symbol add to the deeper meaning of the poem, in particular their relationship?

Why does the man say he “won’t come down the stairs” in line 42?

Independent Practice

In a small, respond to one of the following questions:

Consider how the form and structure affect the meaning of the poem.

  1. The title “Home Burial” initially seems to reference the burial of the couple’s child. As the reader reads on however, other clues come out of the poem. For example, the reader learns in line 24 that the house must belong to the man’s family as “his people” are buried in the graveyard, while in line 39, the woman expresses she “must get out of here.” Given these details and the tone of the poem, how can its title be considered figuratively? How else does Frost use symbolism in the poem?
  2. The poem nearly reads like prose, yet Frost specifically wrote it as a poem. Parts of the dialogue feel very real, while others contain poetic elements. For example, lines 79 and 80 read very poetically, particularly because of the alliteration. What poetic elements does the poem contain to separate it from prose and how do they effect the poem’s meaning?
  3. According to the husband, the wife is exaggerating the grief, but she thinks he is taking the death nonchalantly. How does each character view death and choose to grieve for their lost child? What clues from the poem lead you to your conclusion?
  4. The poem is about a fight between a husband and wife. Who wins the fight in the end? Who has more power in the relationship? Which specific words and lines lead to your conclusion?

Check for understanding: Present to the class.

Homework#4:

  1. Respond to all four questions above.
  2. Write a first draft of the essay on ESSAY QUESTIONS #2 OR #4.

Q2: Write and explain a global, multi-part claim about some aspect of author’s craft in “Home Burial,” and how that craft contributes to a “general and pervasive” meaning of the story as it has emerged for them through close reading and analysis.

Q4: Write and explain a global, multi-part claim about an identified theme in the poem, considering this definition by Cleanth Brooks and Robert Penn Warren about the relationships between theme and other aspects of a literary work: “The theme is what is made of the topic. It is the comment on the topic that is implied in the process of the story… The theme is what a piece of fiction stacks up to… the pervasive and unifying view of life which is embodied in the total narrative… the structure into which the various elements are fitted and in terms of which they achieve unity.”

Due April 19.

___________________________________

Lesson 4

Objectives: Students will be able to analyze the poem ” Home Burial” by Robert Frost through poetic devices such as meter, form, symbolism and imagery.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.9-10.2
Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.9-10.1
Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

  • Students select details from the text  based on their individual reading experience and understanding of the text.
  • They are also given various options to respond to the poem depending on their personal level of challenges or strengths.
  • Students can raise their own questions to probe into the implied meaning of the poem.
  • structure of the essay
  • rubric

Grouping Rationale: Students will be grouped based on personal choice with consideration of individual learning needs, styles, talents and personality to maximize their productivity. In each group, all participants are contributors; but they will take turns to be a timer, facilitator, recorder,or presenter.

Resources:

Do now:

  • Jot down one question that you need clarification on the personal whiteboard about the peom. Pair-share.

Mini Lesson

  • Respond to students’ questions and concerns.
  • Model the analyzing process through a specific strategy.

 

Write out the first draft of the analysis essay of Robert Frost’s poem based on the EBC worksheets.Additional Notes on writing the essay-

Your Task: Closely read the poem” Home Burial” by Robert Frost and write a well-developed, text-based response of 3-4 paragraphs. In your response, identify a central idea in the text and analyze how the author’s use of one writing strategy (literary element or literary technique or rhetorical device) develops this central idea. Use strong and thorough evidence from the text to support your analysis. Do not simply summarize the text.

Guidelines: Be sure to:

  • Identify a central idea in the text
  • Analyze how the author’s use of one writing strategy (literary element or literary technique or rhetorical device) develops this central idea. Examples include: characterization, conflict, denotation/connotation, metaphor, simile, irony, language use, point-of-view, setting, structure, symbolism, theme, tone, etc.
  • Use strong and thorough evidence from the text to support your analysis
  • Organize your ideas in a cohesive and coherent manner
  • Maintain a formal style of writing
  • Follow the conventions of standard written English

How to write an effective thesis statement?

  • Directly address the essay question
  • there is a shift ( tension) within the statement
  • state the literary devices used by the author

 How to write an introduction?

  1. Provide one -sentence comment on the topic you are writing.
  2. Provide an appropriate context of the narrative
  3. State the thesis statement

 How to write a conclusion?

  • Restate the most important point you have been making throughout the essay but in different words.
  • Make a real life connection (how is the discussion relevant in real life?)

 Body Paragraph structure:

  • Topic Sentence-Claim
  • Context ( cite the sentences where you will “zoom’ in on specific words or phrase for your analysis
  • Point out he words and phrases that are connected to your claim
  • ( Analysis)Explain why the specific words and phrases represent the deeper meaning
  • Making connections aback to your thesis ( so what)

Textual Analysis Structure

Introduction: ( 3-4 sentences)

  1. State the central idea of the passage
  2. State the (one) strategy that the authors uses to illustrate the central idea
  3. Explain two steps of how the author DEVELOPS his central idea through the strategy by using the word “ first, the author….;then the author…

Body

Body Paragraph 1:

  1. Topic sentence ( first the author uses ___________( a strategy) to describe/portray…
  2. Context: quotations ( 2- 3 examples) – omit words you don’t need by using …
  3. Zoom in ( go back to the textual evidence you have cited) and point out specific words or phrases that show a pattern . Bring out the deeper meaning( what do the details say about your claim or author’s central idea)
  4. So what: making a connection back to your claim

Body Paragraph 2:

  1. Topic sentence ( then the author uses ___________( a strategy) to describe/portray…
  2. Context: quotations ( 2- 3 examples) – omit words you don’t need by using …
  3. Zoom in ( go back to the textual evidence you have cited) and point out specific words or phrases that show a pattern . Bring out the deeper meaning( what do the details say about your claim or author’s central idea)
  4. So what: making a connection back to your claim

Conclusion: Restate the central idea with different words; how does the central idea connect to a universal truth?

Tips: Two claims should be different- the 2nd claim should be based on the first claim

Independent Practice

Compose ( or revise the 1st draft) the essay using the checklist and rubric provided.

Expected Outcomes:

  1. Picked out a strategy and examples.
  2. Generate a thesis statement ( central idea)
  3. State two claims clearly that connect to the thesis ( central idea).
  4. Complete the introductory paragraph.

Exit Slip: Write a number on the white board to show your confidence level with writing the essay.

Homework: Revise the essay. Final draft due tomorrow.

___________________________________________________

Emily Dickinson ” Because I Could Not Stop for Death”

Lesson 1

Objectives: Students will be able to write a poem about Emily Dickinson that tells the story about the extraordinary female poet.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.9-10.1
Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.9-10.2
Determine a central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.9-10.3
Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences.

Differentiation:

  • Students select details from various texts  based on their individual reading experience and understanding of the text.
  • They are also given various options to respond to the task depending on their personal level of challenges or strengths.
  • Students can raise their own questions to probe into the implied meaning of the poem.
  • video clips and articles

Grouping Rationale: Students will be grouped based on personal choice with consideration of individual learning needs, styles, talents and personality to maximize their productivity. In each group, all participants are contributors; but they will take turns to be a timer, facilitator, recorder,or presenter.

Do Now: What do you know about Emily Dickinson? 1830-1886 US? Writers from New England?

Write down your responses on the whiteboard and share in your small group.

Generate two questions: what else do I want to know about the poet?

Mini Lesson: 

We’ll watch a video about the poet.

Independent Practice

Each group gets one computer. Use the notes to write a group poem about the poet. The poem is to –

  • introduce to the reader some of the most important information about her.
  • her life
  • her poetry
  • the themes in her poetry
  • her differences from the norm
  • one or two expressions by her

Expected Outcome:

  • small group members ‘ collaboration
  • typed up the 1st draft of a poem
  • use of notes and information online
  • every member in the group needs to have a copy of the poem
  • share a few lines if not the entire poem with the class

Homework#2: Revise the poem individually and turn it in tomorrow.

________________________________________

Lesson 2

Objectives: Students will be able to infer the author’s attitude or tone toward death.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.9-10.2
Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.9-10.1
Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

  • Students select details from the text  based on their individual reading experience and understanding of the text.
  • They are also given various options to respond to the poem depending on their personal level of challenges or strengths.
  • Students can raise their own questions to probe into the implied meaning of the poem.
  • structure of the essay
  • rubric

Grouping Rationale: Students will be grouped based on personal choice with consideration of individual learning needs, styles, talents and personality to maximize their productivity. In each group, all participants are contributors; but they will take turns to be a timer, facilitator, recorder,or presenter.

Resources: Literary devices

Do Now:  share the poem you have written about Emily Dickinson.

Mini Lesson

  1. what’s an extended metaphor? Imagery?
  2. How to read a metaphysical poem?
    -surface
    -deep meaning
  3. Read the poem out loud  and envision what you see through her depiction.  What helps you see t them in your mind?
  4. What kind of language does she use, physical or abstract, vague or clear?

Independent Practice

Identify an example of extended metaphor and imagery  and discuss how each device helps reveal a central idea.

Homework #3:

  1. Type the poem about Emily Dickenson
  2. Generate one central idea based on TPCASTT worksheet.

_________________________________________________________________________

Lesson 3

Objectives: Students will be able to analyze how Dickinson uses poetic devices such as anaphora and rhyme to develop a central idea.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.9-10.2
Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.9-10.1
Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

  • Students select details from the text  based on their individual reading experience and understanding of the text.
  • They are also given various options to respond to the poem depending on their personal level of challenges or strengths.
  • Students can raise their own questions to probe into the implied meaning of the poem.
  • structure of the essay
  • rubric

Grouping Rationale: Students will be grouped based on personal choice with consideration of individual learning needs, styles, talents and personality to maximize their productivity. In each group, all participants are contributors; but they will take turns to be a timer, facilitator, recorder,or presenter.

Resources:

Do Now:  Share with an elbow partner your poem. Identify a literary device used in your partner’s poem. (literary devices in pop culture)

Mini Lesson: 

Everyone is a poet.

How to read poetry? Film clip from Dead Poets Society

Why do we read poetry?

Poetry is for everybody

Introducing poetic devices through pop music

How to use TPCASST to analyze a poem?

Take notes when listening. Jot down questions if there is an area you don’t understand.

TPCASST RAP

What’s a symbol? (4:20)

Figurative Language in songs and its effects

Independent Practice

Use your new understanding to revise your TPCASTT sheet in particular, bring out the deeper meaning through a specific poetric device .Create a group one to be handed in.

Expected Outcome:

  1. Revised TPCASTT sheet by the group.
  2. Use the group rubric to self-evaluate the collaboration.

Homework#4: 

Respond to the Study Questions on “Because I Could Not stop Death”

  1. What impression does the reader have of Death? What specific words or lines lead to that impression?
  2. What meter does the poem follow? How does the rhythm make the poem feel?
  3. Line 3 contains the word “carriage.” Considering the actors, what do you think this carriage symbolizes?
  4. In the third stanza, Dickinson uses the word “passed” repeatedly. What kind of word is it and what effect does it have in the third stanza?
  5. What is the narrator experiencing in stanza four? What words clue the reader in to this?
  6. What is different about the ‘fist line in stanza four and what is its significance given its timing in the poem?
  7. What do you notice about the verb tenses used throughout the poem? How are they compared throughout the stanzas and what do they tell the reader about the narrator?
  8. What kind of language in general does Dickinson use throughout the poem? Is it physical or abstract, vague or clear? Is the language constant for the duration of the piece? What effect does this have on the poem’s meaning?

___________________________________________________

Lesson 4

Objectives: Students will be able to analyze how Dickinson uses poetic devices such as symbol ,anaphora and rhyme to develop a central idea.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.9-10.2
Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.9-10.1
Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

  • Students select details from the text  based on their individual reading experience and understanding of the text.
  • They are also given various options to respond to the poem depending on their personal level of challenges or strengths.
  • Students can raise their own questions to probe into the implied meaning of the poem.
  • structure of the essay
  • rubric

Grouping Rationale: Students will be grouped based on personal choice with consideration of individual learning needs, styles, talents and personality to maximize their productivity. In each group, all participants are contributors; but they will take turns to be a timer, facilitator, recorder,or presenter.

Resources:

Do Now:  Write down three examples of poetic devices from song lyrics. Come up with one example of your own or from song. Share with a table partner.

Mini Lesson

How to use TPCASST to analyze a poem?

Take notes when listening. Jot down questions if there is an area you don’t understand.

TPCASST RAP

What’s a symbol? (4:20)

What is  a symbol? Identify symbols in the poem. What does each symbol represent?

  • Death
  • The carriage
  • The sunset
  • the house
  • the horses

The repetition of a word or phrase throughout a poem is called anaphora and it’s a technique poets use a lot in order to help the poem progress as a well as tie it together.

Independent Practice

In a small group, students will identify one poetic device that they have identifies in Dickinson’s poem. Find the example and determine its meaning and effect. They can pick one from the following-

  • extended metaphor
  • symbol
  • personification
  • anaphora
  • alliteration
  • imagery
  • setting
  • tone

After 5 minutes, students will share their example with the rest of the class .

Expected outcome: Students should be able to understand at least tow poetic devices used in the poem and their effects.

Homework#5: Select one literary device and two or three examples of he devices form the poem. Analyze the meaning and effect. Draw a conclusion that is the central idea. Use the claim worksheet.

Homework#6: Write a well-developed paragraph to develop one of the central ideas of the poem through one specific strategy. Identify two examples of the strategy and discuss how they contribute to the development of the central idea.

________________________________________

Lesson 5

Objectives: Students will be able to analyze how Dickinson uses poetic devices such as symbol ,anaphora and rhyme to develop a central idea.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.9-10.2
Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.9-10.1
Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

  • Students select details from the text  based on their individual reading experience and understanding of the text.
  • They are also given various options to respond to the poem depending on their personal level of challenges or strengths.
  • Students can raise their own questions to probe into the implied meaning of the poem.
  • structure of the essay
  • rubric

Grouping Rationale: Students will be grouped based on personal choice with consideration of individual learning needs, styles, talents and personality to maximize their productivity. In each group, all participants are contributors; but they will take turns to be a timer, facilitator, recorder,or presenter.

Resources:

Do Now:  Share a claim worksheet you have completed using the EBC rubric.

Mini Lesson: 

What’s a symbol? (4:20)

What is  a symbol? Identify symbols in the poem. What does each symbol represent? How does the symbol enhance the poet’s message?

  • Death
  • The carriage
  • The sunset
  • the house
  • the horses

The repetition of a word or phrase throughout a poem is called anaphora and it’s a technique poets use a lot in order to help the poem progress as a well as tie it together.

Independent Practice

Each group decides on a specific role for each group member-

  • recorder
  • facilitator
  • presenter ( timer if there are only three members)
  • timer

In a small group, students will identify one poetic device and three examples or such a device  in Dickinson’s poem. They will analyze the meaning of the  examples to determine how they help the poet develop a central idea . They can pick one from the following-

  • extended metaphor
  • symbol
  • personification
  • anaphora
  • alliteration
  • imagery
  • setting
  • tone

After 6 minutes, students will share their example with the rest of the class .

Expected outcome: Students should be able to understand at least tow poetic devices used in the poem and their effects.

Homework#7 Organize your group discussion into a well- developed paragraph in which you identify one specific poetic strategy and use three examples of such a strategy to discuss how the author develops her ideas.

_________________________

Lesson 6

Objectives: Students will be able to analyze how Dickinson uses poetic devices such as symbol ,anaphora and rhyme to develop a central idea.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.9-10.2
Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.9-10.1
Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

  • Students select details from the text  based on their individual reading experience and understanding of the text.
  • They are also given various options to respond to the poem depending on their personal level of challenges or strengths.
  • Students can raise their own questions to probe into the implied meaning of the poem.
  • structure of the essay
  • rubric

Grouping Rationale: Students will be grouped based on personal choice with consideration of individual learning needs, styles, talents and personality to maximize their productivity. In each group, all participants are contributors; but they will take turns to be a timer, facilitator, recorder,or presenter.

Resources:

Do now:  Select one most effective strategy that you believe the author uses to express a central idea. Name the streategy and describe the central idea. Briefly how the strategy helps convey the idea. Write down your thoughts on the personal whiteboard.

Mini Lesson

Meter:

  1. Iambic (the noun is iamb or iambus): a lightly stressed syllable followed by a heavily stressed syllable u /
  2.  Trochaic (the noun is trochee): a stressed followed by a light syllable / u
  3.  Anapestic (the noun is anapest): two light syllables followed by a stressed syllable u u /
  4. Dactylic (the noun is dactyl): a stressed syllable followed by two light syllables syllables: / uu
  • If a line has four feet, it is tetrameter.
  • If a line has five feet, it is pentameter.
  • If it has six feet, it is hexameter, and so on.

What’s a symbol? (4:20)

What is  a symbol? Identify symbols in the poem. What does each symbol represent? How does the symbol enhance the poet’s message?

  • Death
  • The carriage
  • The sunset
  • the house
  • the horses

New Concepts:

Anaphora:

The repetition of a word or phrase throughout a poem is called anaphora and it’s a technique poets use a lot in order to help the poem progress as a well as tie it together.

Metonymy: A metonymy is a word or phrase that is used to stand in for another word. Sometimes a metonymy is chosen because it is a well-known characteristic of the word. One famous example of metonymy is the saying, “The pen is mightier than the sword,

Independent Practice

Each group decides on a specific role for each group member-

  • recorder
  • facilitator
  • presenter ( timer if there are only three members)
  • timer

In a small group, students will complete the 2-point claim worksheet on page 7 by-

  1. identifying  one poetic device form the list below.
  2. the meaning the device helps convey
  3. Point 1 with three supporting evidence
  4. Point 2 with three supporting evidence
  • extended metaphor
  • symbol
  • personification
  • anaphora
  • alliteration
  • imagery
  • setting
  • tone

After 6 minutes, students will share their example with the rest of the class .

Expected outcome: Students should be able to understand –

  • a claim needs to be proved by two points
  • each of the two points need to be supported by three pieces of evidence
  • each evidence needs to be an example of the poetic device
  • use the rubric to evaluate their claims.

Exit Slip: Hand in group EBC worksheets.

Homework#8: Write out the first draft of the analysis essay of Dickinson’s poem based on the EBC worksheets.

Your Task: Closely read the poem” Because I Could Not Stop for Death” by Emily Dickinson and write a well-developed, text-based response of 3-4 paragraphs. In your response, identify a central idea in the text and analyze how the author’s use of one writing strategy (literary element or literary technique or rhetorical device) develops this central idea. Use strong and thorough evidence from the text to support your analysis. Do not simply summarize the text.

Guidelines: Be sure to:

  • Identify a central idea in the text
  • Analyze how the author’s use of one writing strategy (literary element or literary technique or rhetorical device) develops this central idea. Examples include: characterization, conflict, denotation/connotation, metaphor, simile, irony, language use, point-of-view, setting, structure, symbolism, theme, tone, etc.
  • Use strong and thorough evidence from the text to support your analysis
  • Organize your ideas in a cohesive and coherent manner
  • Maintain a formal style of writing
  • Follow the conventions of standard written English

____________________________________

Lesson 7

Objectives: Students will be able to analyze how Dickinson uses poetic devices such as symbol ,anaphora and rhyme to develop a central idea.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.9-10.2
Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.9-10.1
Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

  • Students select details from the text  based on their individual reading experience and understanding of the text.
  • They are also given various options to respond to the poem depending on their personal level of challenges or strengths.
  • Students can raise their own questions to probe into the implied meaning of the poem.
  • structure of the essay
  • rubric

Grouping Rationale: Students will be grouped based on personal choice with consideration of individual learning needs, styles, talents and personality to maximize their productivity. In each group, all participants are contributors; but they will take turns to be a timer, facilitator, recorder,or presenter.

Resources:

Do now:

  • Jot down one question that you need clarification on the personal whiteboard. Pair-share.

Mini Lesson

  • Respond to students’ questions and concerns.
  • Model the analyzing process through a specific strategy.
(Introduction) Death is often portrayed as menacing in many works of literary. In Emily Dickinson’s poem “Because I Could Not Stop for Death”, she provides a different perspective. Through the use of descriptive language, Dickinson portrays death as a nonthreatening and peaceful experience, and conveys one must accept death as part of his or her destiny (central idea).

( Body 1) From the very beginning of the poem, Dickinson uses descriptive language to portray death a safe and lonely but dignified experience (claim 1). She begins by introducing “ Death” to her reader as kind and civil as illustrated in “ kindly stopped for me” and” his Civility”. Even though the speaker cannot stop Death from coming, she regards the act of Death as “kind” and dignified because He is taking her in a “carriage” suggesting a sheltered safe journey. Dickinson continues to describe death as solemn and dignified as illustrated in the way Death drives, “slowly”, “ no haste” and “ his Civility”( point 1) .On the other hand, the speaker also finds the journey to be lonely since there are only themselves ( she and death) as illustrated in “ the carriage held but just ourselves”. The adverb “just” suggests slight trepidation of taking the ride alone with death himself and remorse that there is no other passenger riding with her to accompany her ( point 2). The silence and dignity felt by the speaker during the lonely ride with death reveals dying is essentially a dignified life experience and one has to experience it alone.

( Body 2) As Dickinson continue describing the speaker’s journey to death,  she further reveals that death can give a sense of tranquility and peace if one regards it as part of one’s destiny( claim 2) . The speaker, while sitting in the carriage, sees her life pass by her through the descriptions such as “children strove”, “fields of gazing grain” and “the setting sun” suggesting her childhood, maturity and the near end of her life. “Gazing grain” indicates maturity and “the setting sun” symbolizes her life’s ending life the sun going out of the horizon. Dickinson’s portrayal of death as “ gossamer” appearance and the speaker as “ tulle” reveals death is an intangible experience, magical and hard to grasp but soothing since both “ gossamer” and “ tulle” connote translucent, soft and silky. Finally Dickinson portrays the tomb the speaker sees as “a House that seems a swelling of the ground”. To compare tomb to a house, the poet seems to regard death as going home experience- safe, tranquil and peaceful. The speaker’s serenity as she reaches her final destination connotes the idea that death is everyone’s final destiny, thus no surprises and no pain but acceptance.

( Conclusion) Through the use descriptive language, Dickinson reveal death is part of life experiences and there is no need to fear it. Even though no one is going to seek death, death will eventually find everyone, but treat him/her with dignity. Therefore, death is not that strange but should feel like going home- the end of one’s life journey.

Write out the first draft of the analysis essay of Dickinson’s poem based on the EBC worksheets.Additional Notes on writing the essay-

Your Task: Closely read the poem” Because I Could Not Stop for Death” by Emily Dickinson and write a well-developed, text-based response of 3-4 paragraphs. In your response, identify a central idea in the text and analyze how the author’s use of one writing strategy (literary element or literary technique or rhetorical device) develops this central idea. Use strong and thorough evidence from the text to support your analysis. Do not simply summarize the text.

Guidelines: Be sure to:

  • Identify a central idea in the text
  • Analyze how the author’s use of one writing strategy (literary element or literary technique or rhetorical device) develops this central idea. Examples include: characterization, conflict, denotation/connotation, metaphor, simile, irony, language use, point-of-view, setting, structure, symbolism, theme, tone, etc.
  • Use strong and thorough evidence from the text to support your analysis
  • Organize your ideas in a cohesive and coherent manner
  • Maintain a formal style of writing
  • Follow the conventions of standard written English

How to write an effective thesis statement?

  • Directly address the essay question
  • there is a shift ( tension) within the statement
  • state the literary devices used by the author

 How to write an introduction?

  1. Provide one -sentence comment on the topic you are writing.
  2. Provide an appropriate context of the narrative
  3. State the thesis statement

 How to write a conclusion?

  • Restate the most important point you have been making throughout the essay but in different words.
  • Make a real life connection (how is the discussion relevant in real life?)

 Body Paragraph structure:

  • Topic Sentence-Claim
  • Context ( cite the sentences where you will “zoom’ in on specific words or phrase for your analysis
  • Point out he words and phrases that are connected to your claim
  • ( Analysis)Explain why the specific words and phrases represent the deeper meaning
  • Making connections aback to your thesis ( so what)

Textual Analysis Structure

Introduction: ( 3-4 sentences)

  1. State the central idea of the passage
  2. State the (one) strategy that the authors uses to illustrate the central idea
  3. Explain two steps of how the author DEVELOPS his central idea through the strategy by using the word “ first, the author….;then the author…

Body

Body Paragraph 1:

  1. Topic sentence ( first the author uses ___________( a strategy) to describe/portray…
  2. Context: quotations ( 2- 3 examples) – omit words you don’t need by using …
  3. Zoom in ( go back to the textual evidence you have cited) and point out specific words or phrases that show a pattern . Bring out the deeper meaning( what do the details say about your claim or author’s central idea)
  4. So what: making a connection back to your claim

Body Paragraph 2:

  1. Topic sentence ( then the author uses ___________( a strategy) to describe/portray…
  2. Context: quotations ( 2- 3 examples) – omit words you don’t need by using …
  3. Zoom in ( go back to the textual evidence you have cited) and point out specific words or phrases that show a pattern . Bring out the deeper meaning( what do the details say about your claim or author’s central idea)
  4. So what: making a connection back to your claim

Conclusion: Restate the central idea with different words; how does the central idea connect to a universal truth?

Tips: Two claims should be different- the 2nd claim should be based on the first claim

Independent Practice

Compose ( or revise the 1st draft) the essay using the checklist and rubric provided.

Expected Outcomes:

  1. Picked out a strategy and examples.
  2. Generate a thesis statement ( central idea)
  3. State two claims clearly that connect to the thesis ( central idea).
  4. Complete the introductory paragraph.

Exit Slip: Hand in your thesis statement.

Homework#8: Continue working on revising or completing your essay using the rubric and checklist provided to guide your writing.