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Memory Writing for Lincoln Center Theater Project

Lesson Plan on The Glass Menagerie

Objectives: Students will be able to respond critically to the play, The Glass Menagerie, by identifying a specific moment, line or object (motif )  through which they create a personal memoir, or a narrative that uses an object or imagery as motif.

CCS

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.11-12.3
Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.11-12.3.A
Engage and orient the reader by setting out a problem, situation, or observation and its significance, establishing one or multiple point(s) of view, and introducing a narrator and/or characters; create a smooth progression of experiences or events.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.11-12.3.D
Use precise words and phrases, telling details, and sensory language to convey a vivid picture of the experiences, events, setting, and/or characters.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.11-12.3.E
Provide a conclusion that follows from and reflects on what is experienced, observed, or resolved over the course of the narrative.

Differentiation:

Content: Students with various writing abilities can select a technique or idea from the menu provided to write a narrative. Each student draws materials from his/her personal experiences for the writing task. Students’ topic is of personal interests and choice. Pair share and class discussion will also provide further assistance to students’ understanding of using narrative techniques to describe a memory.

Grouping rationale: Students will be grouped based on their strengths and weaknesses as a reader and writer to complete the task.

Do Now: Close your eyes and refresh your memory about the play, The Glass Menagerie. Is there anything that stands out to you, repeatedly? A sound, image, word or phrase, an object, a line etc.? Pick out one moment or imagery or object (motif) and describe it: How is it represented? How is it connected to the character or theme of the play? Is there any other significance for the playwright to include it in the play? Why does it stand out to you? Write about 7-8 minutes.

Teaching Points:

According to Miller and Paola, in their book Tell it Slant, “The memories that can have the most emotional impact for the writer are those who don’t really understand, the images that rise up before us quite without our volition…These are the ‘river teeth’, or the moments of being, the ones that suck your breath away.”

  1. What repository of memory do you hold in your heart rather than your head?
  2. What are the pictures that rise to the surface without bidding?
  3. Take these as your cue. Pick you pen. This is where you begin.

Metaphorical memory:

Think back on that early morning of yours, the one that came to mind instantly. Illuminate the details, shine a spot on them until they begin to yield a sense of truth revealed. Where is your body in this memory? What kind of language does it speak? What metaphor does it offer for you to puzzle out in writing?

Muscle memory:

The body, memory, and mind exist in sublime interdependence, each part wholly twined with the others. These memories will have resonance precisely because they have not been forced into being by a mind insistent on fixed meanings. It is the body’s story and so one that resonates with a sense of an inadvertent truth revealed. Sometimes, what matters to us most is what has mattered to the body. Memory may pretend to live in the cerebral cortex, but it requires real muscle to animate it again for the page.

The five senses of memory

By paying attention to the sensory gateways of the body, you also begin to write in a way that naturally embodies experience, making it tactile for the reader. Readers tend to care deeply only about those things they feel in the body at a visceral level. And so as a writer, consider your vocation as that of a translator: one who renders the abstract into the concrete. We experience the world through our senses. WE MUST TANSLATE THAT EXPEIENCE INTO LANGUAGE OF THE SENSES AS WELL.

  • Smell: “Smell is a potent wizard that transports us thousands of miles and all the years we have lived,” wrote Hellen Keller.
    • What are the smells you remember that even in memory makes you stop a moment and breathe deeply or make your heart beat more vigorously, your palms ache for what’s been lost? Write these down. Write as quickly as you can, seeing how one smell leads to another. What kind of images, memories, or stories might arise from this sensory trigger?
  • Taste: Food is one of the most social gifts we have. The bond between mother and child forms over the feeding of that child. When you sit down to unburden yourself to a friend, you often do so over a meal prepared together in the kitchen. In his famous essay “Afternoon of an American Boy,” B. White  vividly remembers that taste of cinnamon toast in conjunction with the first stumbling overtures of a boyhood crush.
    • What are the tastes that carry the most emotion for you? The tastes that, even in memory, make you stop a moment and run your tong over your lips? Write them down as quickly as you can. Which scenes, memories, associations come to the surface?
  • Hearing: Sounds often make up a subliminal backdrop to our lives, and even the faintest echo can tug back moments from the past in their entirety. Music is not so subtle but rather acts as a blaring soundtrack to our emotional lives. We often orchestrate our memories around the music that accompanies those pivotal eras of our lives. When you have the soundtrack down, the rest of life seems to fall into place.
  • Touch: We are constantly aware of our bodies, of how they feel as they move through the world. Without these senses, we become lost, disoriented in space and time. And the people who have affected us the most are the ones who have touched us in some way, who have reached beyond this barrier of skin and made contact with our small, isolated selves. Think about the people in your life who have touched you deeply. What was the quality of their physical touch on your body? How did they touch the objects around them? Why do you think touch lingers in memory?
  • Sight: How do you see the world? How do you see yourself? Even linguistically, our sense of sight seems so tied up in our perceptions, stance, opinions, personalities, and knowledge of the world. To see something often means to finally understand, to be enlightened, to have our vision cleared. What we choose to see-and not to see- often says more about us than anything else. When we “look back” in memory, we “see” those memories. Our minds have cataloged an inexhaustible storehouse of visual images. Now the trick is for you to render these images in writing. Pay attention to the smaller details. Close your eyes to see the images more clearly. Trace the shape of your favorite thing or the outline of a beloved’s face. Turn up the light in the living room. Go out walking under a full moon. Look at some photos and videos you have taken. Not only do these photos and films act as triggers for your memory but they can prompt you to delve more deeply below the surface.

Student Independent Practice

From the exercises above, select a motif that can BEST represent your memory. Write a narrative that either incorporates or evolves around the motif to reveal a part of your past that sheds light on you or your relationship with people you care about in your life. The narrative should be between 500-700 words in lengths.

Exit Slip: Share the “river teeth” of your memory.

Homework Assignment: Complete the personal narrative and turn it in on Friday.

Essay Contest

   ESSAY CONTEST FOR 10th, 11TH AND 12TH GRADE STUDENTS
 
The Association of Justices of the Supreme Court of the State of New York and the New York Law Journal have partnered with the New York City Dept. of Education to sponsor the Sixteenth annual essay contest for 10th, 11th and 12th grade high school students.  Ten students will win the opportunity to intern for one week with a Justice of the Supreme Court and earn a $100.00 gift card.  A maximum of ten entries from each school will be considered. One of the winning essays will be published in the New York Law Journal, a legal periodical published by the ALM.  
                                                                                                                                               
The Law Day theme for 2017, is “The 14th Amendment:  Transforming American Democracy.”
The 2017 theme provides the opportunity to explore the many ways that the Fourteenth Amendment has reshaped American law and society.  Ratified during Reconstruction a century and a half ago, the Fourteenth Amendment serves as the cornerstone of landmark civil rights legislation, the foundation for numerous court decisions protecting fundamental rights, and a  inspiration for all those who advocate for equal justice under law.
 
Students should write a 500 word essay presenting a compelling discussion on the topic with special focus on the importance and impact of the Fourteenth Amendment.
                                               
The following websites may assist your students in their research – other resources may be used.  All sources should be credited.
Law Day Topic  http://www.Lawday.org
General Legal Resources
 1.  New York State Courts Legal Research Portal
2.   Free Online Law Review/Journal Articles
3.   New York Law Journal
            http://www.newyorklawjournal.com
4.   The United States Constitution with Commentary
           
Statutes
1 New York State Consolidated Laws
2.   Law Library of Congress
3.   New York Courts Law Libraries
           
 Case Law 
1.   New York State Court Case Law
2.   Federal Court Case Law

MP 1 Reflection

Objectives: Students will be able to reflect on their performance during the 1st MP and  set new and applicable goals for the 2nd MP.

Do now: Review portfolio; check Skedula

Mini Lesson:

Review student model essay and- explains why the essay was scored a 4

Independent practice

Making up work you missed and write a reflection for the first MP-

1. Work ethics
2. Attendance  & Punctuality
3. Class Participation- verbal and written; active listening
4. Homework
5. Skill assessment: what are you still struggling with when writing a textual analysis essay? What’s your understanding? What do you want to improve during the 2nd  MP?

Homework:

1. Research about Emily Dickinson  and select 5 details about her life or work that you want to share with your group members on Wednesday.  Copy them in your notebook.
2. What was happening in the U.S. during 1830-1886? Select three events that are meaningful to you.
3. Where is New England in the U.S.? Who are some of the most famous writers who came from the region? List three.

The Poet and His Craft

Day 1

Objectives: Students will be able to write a literary analysis  of the poem Whitman’s poem ” I hear American Singing” through a complete writing process and the synthesis of various sources.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.9-10.1
Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.9-10.2
Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.9-10.9
Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.9-10.2.B
Develop the topic with well-chosen, relevant, and sufficient facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples appropriate to the audience’s knowledge of the topic.
Differentiation: Students select details from the scene  based on their individual reading experience and understanding of the text. They are also given various options to respond to the poem depending on their personal level of challenges or strengths. Students can raise their own questions to probe into the implied meaning of the poem.
Grouping Rationale: Students will be grouped based on personal choice with consideration of individual learning needs, styles, talents and personality to maximize their productivity. In each group, all participants are contributors; but several of them will also be a timer, recorder, facilitator, presenter, spelling/grammar checker.

Agenda

  1. Do Now
  2. Read and discuss ” William Stafford: The Poet and His craft”
  3. Read and discuss the poem ” Fifteen”
  4. Analyze a student Model
  5. Write independently a literary analysis of Whitman’s poem ” I hear American Singing”

Do Now: What’s your understanding of literary analysis? Pair share.

Mini Lesson and Guided Practice

In reading groups-

  1. Read and discuss ” William Stafford: The Poet and His craft”

Based on the essay, what might you expect Stafford’s poetry to be like? Discuss with a partner and cite evidence from the essay.

2. Read and discuss the poem ” Fifteen” ( What words in the last stanza signifies a shift in the point of view? What does this speaker realize at this point?

HW#1: How is the poem “Fifteen” connected to the essay ,” William Stafford: The Poet and His craft”? Show evidence.

______________________

Day 2

Objectives: Students will be able to discern how the student uses the biography and the essay to inform her analysis of the poem and apply the same strategy for their own analysis of the poem.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.9-10.2
Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.9-10.9
Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.
Do now: Pair-share- How is the poem “Fifteen” connected to the essay ,” William Stafford: The Poet and His craft”? Show evidence.
Teaching Points:
How to read poetry closely?
  1. Look for pattern-repetition, figurative language, motif
  2. Identify binary of ideas ( opposing  and shift)
  3. Anomaly ( unusual usage of words and phrases)

Guided Practice 

Read the poem ” Fifteen” and look for the details mentioned above. How do these details help you gain a deeper meaning of the poem?

Independent Practice:

Activity 1: Analyze a student Model

How did Jennifer use the biography and the essay to inform her analysis of the poem? Cite evidence for your discussion.

Activity 2: You will write a literary analysis to explore how Whitman’s life experiences are reflected in his poem ” I hear America Singing” and his journal entry ” The Real War Will Never Get in the Books”.

Step 1: Read source 1( page 90) and underline /circle information that may be useful when you write the essay.

Step 2: Read and discuss source 2(91-92): Why might Whitman have called his experiences nursing in the Civil War ” the most profound lesson” of his life? What do you think he learned?

Step 3: Read  and discuss source 3: What’s Whitman’s tone, or attitude, toward the man in the remarkable hat? Cite evidence for your response.( page 93-94)

HW#2 Complete steps 1-3.

___________________________

Day 3

Objectives: Students will be able to structure a literary analysis essay based on multiple sources by carefully examining the structure of a sample essay.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.9-10.2
Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.
CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.9-10.9
Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.11-12.2
Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.

Do now: What’s your understanding of synthesizing of two sources?

Teaching Points:

Structure of a literary analysis based on two sources-

  1. Where do you introduce your thesis or central idea ?
  2. How do you develop each aspect of your thesis?
  3. How do we use topic sentence as a ” rope” to understanding your points?
  4. How to connect the two sources?

Guided Practice

Read student sample essay and identify the following-

  1. thesis statement ( central idea based on both sources )
  2. Context
  3. Information from text 1 ( craft)
  4. Connecting source 1 with the poem ” fifteen”.

Independent Practice

You will be writing a literary analysis that explores how Whitman’s life experiences are reflected in his poem ” I Hear America Singing” and his journal entry ” The Real War Will Never Get in the Books.” As you read about Whitman’s life and work, underline /circle information that may be useful when you write the essay.

Share in your reading group-

Step 1: Read source 1( page 90) and underline /circle information that may be useful when you write the essay.

Step 2: Read and discuss source 2(91-92): Why might Whitman have called his experiences nursing int he Civil War ” the most profound lesson” of his life? What do you think he learned?

Step 3: Read  and discuss source 3: What’s Whitman’s tone, or attitude, toward the man in the remarkable hat? Cite evidence for your response.( page 93-94)

Synthesis activity: How does ” Letter from Paumanok” reflect Whitman’s life? What does the piece reveal about the author?

Homework#3: Read source 4 and Source 5 and answer the questions on pages 95 and 96.

___________________________________

Day 4

Objectives: Students will be able to analyze various sources about the poet Whitman and makes connections between his life experiences and work.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.9-10.2
Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.
Analyze how an author draws on and transforms source material in a specific work

Do now: Based on source 1, how can a reader know about a writer through his/her work?

Mini Lesson with Guided Practice

  1. Read and discuss source 2(91-92): Why might Whitman have called his experiences nursing int he Civil War ” the most profound lesson” of his life? What do you think he learned?
  2. Read  and discuss source 3: What’s Whitman’s tone, or attitude, toward the man in the remarkable hat? Cite evidence for your response.( page 93-94)

Independent Practice

Small group synthesis activity: Which lines of ” Letter to His Mother” connect in some way with lines from ” The Real War Will Never Get in the Books”? Include specific lines in your thinking and discussion.

Source 5- According to Whitman, how is the recorded history of the war different from the real war? Cite evidence for your response.

 Individually,

  • respond to the questions on page 99.( will be collected )
  • Analyze the sources ( individually complete the blanks)

Homework#4: Develop your Essay  ( pages 102-103)

  • Determine the topic
  • Write  the claim or central idea
  • Choose a stricture and craft the key points

____________________________________

Day 5

Objectives: Students will be able to explore how Whitman’s life experiences are reflected in his poem ” I Hear America Singing” and his journal entry ” The Real War Will Never Get in the Books.”

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.9-10.4

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.9-10.2
Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.
Analyze how an author draws on and transforms source material in a specific work
Differentiation: Students select details from the scene  based on their individual reading experience and understanding of the text. They are also given various options to respond to the poem depending on their personal level of challenges or strengths. Students can raise their own questions to probe into the implied meaning of the poem.
Grouping Rationale: Students will be grouped based on personal choice with consideration of individual learning needs, styles, talents and personality to maximize their productivity. In each group, all participants are contributors; but several of them will also be a timer, recorder, facilitator, presenter, spelling/grammar checker.
Material : Tone word handout
Do now: 
Source 3: Pair share-What’s Whitman’s tone, or attitude, toward the man in the remarkable hat? Cite evidence for your response.( page 93-94)
Mini Lesson with Guided Practice
  • Which lines of ” Letter to His Mother” connect in some way with lines from ” The Real War Will Never Get in the Books”? Include specific lines in your thinking and discussion.
  • Source 5- According to Whitman, how is the recorded history of the war different from the real war? Cite evidence for your response.

Independent Practice

In a small group-Develop your Essay  ( pages 102-103)

  • Determine the topic
  • Write  the claim or central idea
  • Choose a stricture and craft the key points
 Homework #5 :  Draft your essay
__________________________________________________

Day 6  Structuring the Literary Analysis Essay

Objectives: Students will be able to develop their literary essay by analyzing the sources, writing a claim or central idea and choosing a specific structure to organize their ideas logically and effectively.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.9-10.4

Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.9-10.2
Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.
Analyze how an author draws on and transforms source material in a specific work
  • Differentiation: Students select details from the scene  based on their individual reading experience and understanding of the text. They are also given various options to respond to the poem depending on their personal level of challenges or strengths. Students can raise their own questions to probe into the implied meaning of the poem.
  • Grouping Rationale: Students will be grouped based on personal choice with consideration of individual learning needs, styles, talents and personality to maximize their productivity. In each group, all participants are contributors; but several of them will also be a timer, recorder, facilitator, presenter, spelling/grammar checker.
Material : Tone word handout , sample essay and “developing your essay” worksheet
Do Now: In a small group, write and discuss your response on an assigned question on page 99.
Mini Lesson with Guided Practice
Step 1: Use a graphic organizer to select key point before making the comparison. ( page 100)
Share in the reading group.
Step 2: Infer a central idea – an assertion / claim about the topic and comments on its significance
Complete the work sheet individually ( page 101).
Share in the reading group.
Step 3: Independent Practice
  • Choose a structure and craft the key point
  • In your reading group, complete the worksheet on page 102. 
  • For those who have drafted your essay, move on to page 103 to complete the sheet.( individualized)
Homework#6: Draft your essay ( page 107).

__________________________________________________________

Day 7

Revise using the check list and rubric( page 107)

Objectives: Students will be able to revise the literary analysis draft by using the structure checklist and rubric.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.9-10.4

Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.9-10.2
Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.
Analyze how an author draws on and transforms source material in a specific work
  • Differentiation: Students select details from the scene  based on their individual reading experience and understanding of the text. They are also given various options to respond to the poem depending on their personal level of challenges or strengths. Students can raise their own questions to probe into the implied meaning of the poem.
  • Grouping Rationale: Students will be grouped based on personal choice with consideration of individual learning needs, styles, talents and personality to maximize their productivity. In each group, all participants are contributors; but several of them will also be a timer, recorder, facilitator, presenter, spelling/grammar checker.
 Do Now:

Your Task
You will be writing a literary analysis that explores how Whitman’s life experiences are reflected in his poem ” I Hear America Singing” and his journal entry ” The Real War Will Never Get in the Books.” As you read about Whitman’s life and work, underline /circle information that may be useful when you write the essay.
Do now: Share your central idea with a partner in your reading group. What did you notice about it? Do you consider it a strong and clear? Why?
Mini Lesson with Guided Practice
  1. Develop your essay – Write the claim or central idea based on your observations of the connections between Whitman’s life experiences and his poem /journal.( page 101)
  2. How to develop a central idea?
  3. Citation: page 106 How to cite textual evidence?
  4. Structuring your essay

Introduction: Context and thesis statement ( central idea)

Body Paragraph 1: key point 1 of his life experience that influenced the setting of the author’s writings

Body Paragraph 2: key point 2 of his life experience that influenced the voice of the author’s writings

Body Paragraph 3: key point 3 of his life experience that influenced the point of view/perspective of the author’s writings

Conclusion

________________________________________

Day 7

Objectives: Students will be able to revise the literary analysis draft by using the structure checklist and rubric.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.9-10.4

Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.9-10.2
Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.
Analyze how an author draws on and transforms source material in a specific work

Your Task
You will be writing a literary analysis that explores how Whitman’s life experiences are reflected in his poem ” I Hear America Singing” and his journal entry ” The Real War Will Never Get in the Books.” As you read about Whitman’s life and work, underline /circle information that may be useful when you write the essay.

 

Do now: Share your central idea with a partner in your reading group. What did you notice about it? Do you consider it a strong and clear? Why?

Mini Lesson with Guided Practice

Structure of a Textual Analysis Essay

How to approaching an essay topic (task)?

  1. Step 1: Understanding the task
  2. Step 2: Underlying the key words and phrases that help you understand the task
  3. Step 3: Turn the statement into a question
  4. Step 4: Answer the question
  5. Step 5: Describe what you’ll need to do to provide an effective answer to the question(s)
  6. Step 6: Identify the evidence that will help you generate a thesis statement

How to write an effective thesis statement?

  • Directly address the essay question
  • there is a shift ( tension) within the statement
  • state the literary devices used by the author

How to write an introduction?

  1. Provide one -sentence comment on the topic you are writing.
  2. Provide an appropriate context of the narrative
  3. State the thesis statement

 How to write a conclusion?

  • Restate the most important point you have been making throughout the essay but in different words.
  • Make a real life connection (how is the discussion relevant in real life?)

 Body Paragraph structure:

  • Topic Sentence-Claim
  • Context ( cite the sentences where you will “zoom’ in on specific words or phrase for your analysis
  • Point out he words and phrases that are connected to your claim
  • ( Analysis)Explain why the specific words and phrases represent the deeper meaning
  • Making connections aback to your thesis ( so what)

Textual Analysis Structure

Introduction: ( 3-4 sentences)

  1. State the central idea of the passage
  2. State the (one) strategy that the authors uses to illustrate the central idea
  3. Explain two steps of how the author DEVELOPS his central idea through the strategy by using the word “ first, the author….;then the author…

Body

Body Paragraph 1:

  1. Topic sentence ( first the author uses ___________( a strategy) to describe/portray…
  2. Context: quotations ( 2- 3 examples) – omit words you don’t need by using …
  3. Zoom in ( go back to the textual evidence you have cited) and point out specific words or phrases that show a pattern . Bring out the deeper meaning( what do the details say about your claim or author’s central idea)
  4. So what: making a connection back to your claim

Body Paragraph 2:

  1. Topic sentence ( then the author uses ___________( a strategy) to describe/portray…
  2. Context: quotations ( 2- 3 examples) – omit words you don’t need by using …
  3. Zoom in ( go back to the textual evidence you have cited) and point out specific words or phrases that show a pattern . Bring out the deeper meaning( what do the details say about your claim or author’s central idea)
  4. So what: making a connection back to your claim

Conclusion: Restate the central idea with different words; how does the central idea connect to a universal truth?

Tips: Two claims should be different- the 2nd claim should be based on the first claim

Here is an example-

Introduction: state the central idea and name the strategy.

  • A central theme is the narrator’s feelings of despair or helplessness as the realization takes hold that he is being a prisoner in a desolate castle.
  • The write uses the tone, or his voice, to help develop the central idea.

Development

Body Paragraph 1: 

  • Topic sentence: The author uses  tone to help develop the central idea of despair in the story by describing the setting.
  • Context: A brief sugary that helps the reader to understand the evidence- The author describes the character’s surroundings as dull, dreary, grey, stoney and overall very depressing. 
  • Evidence ( that is an example of the writing strategy): Words such as ” stone stairs”, ” narrow darkness of the courtyard” and ” the window…was tall and deep, stone-mullioned and though weather-worn” reinforce this gloomy setting
  • Analysis: how does the evidence help the author develop his central idea? –When the author does this, he immediately implement the idea of depression or sadness into the piece of literature. The author also uses word choice to his advantage. The author is able to use his tone to convey the idea of despair through words and phrases like ” desperate straits” (line 13), ” prisoner” (line 1), ” I was helpless” (line 5 and ” I am, I know, wither being deceived like a baby by my own fears or ..”.( line12).
  • Making a connection back to the central idea: The author is able to convey the idea of desperation and despair through these gloomy quotes and create a tone, which also helps develops the central idea.

Body Paragraph 2:

  • Topic sentence
  • Context
  • Evidence ( that is an example of the writing strategy)
  • Analysis: how does the evidence help the author develop his central idea?
  • Making a connection

Conclusion: Repeat the central idea and how it reveals a universal truth.

Independent Practice

Use the structure or rubric to guide or peer edit your essay.

The following rubric give you a better idea how your essay will be evaluated:

Paragraph Elements A (90+) B(80+) C(70+) D (65) F(65-)
Topic Sentence-Claim: one sentence ( complex), reader’s interpretation, debatable, strong verbs,  a brief reason Include all elements Include most elements Include some elements Include few elements none
Context: main idea of the excerpt, to provide background information, framing the discussion, related to the claim, Helping frame the discussion and relevant to the claim General but relevant General with no clear intention to connect with the claim Vague and irrelevant none
In-Text citation: paragraph or line number, citation in quotation marks Clear and appropriate Clear and some relevancy inconsistent vague none
Example-Introduce the sentence in which the example appears; Single out the word and discuss its meaning Appropriate and precise appropriate General vague none
Explanation:  What do the words appear to describe or mean? Appropriate and precise appropriate general vague none
Analysis: What deeper meaning does the word imply? Why? Insightful and appropriate( with 3+ sentences) Relevant( with 2+ sentences) General( with 1+ sentences) Vague ( 1 sentence) none
Making connections ( so what): Putting all the examples together, how do they contribute to the claim? How do they connect to the claim? Insightful and relevant with clear connection to the claim Relevant with clear connection to the claim General with some connection to the claim
 

Check for Understanding: Hand in your thesis statement ( central idea) with two separate claims ( topic sentences).

Homework#8: 2nd draft due tomorrow.

_____________________________

Day 8 : Peer review ( page 108)

Objectives: Students will be able to revise the literary analysis draft by using the structure checklist and rubric.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.9-10.4

Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.9-10.2
Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.
Analyze how an author draws on and transforms source material in a specific work

Do now: Read a sample student essay. hat did you notice that was successful or needed revision?
Mini Lesson with Guided Practice

Checklist to evaluate your thesis statement?

  • Directly address the essay question
  • there is a shift ( tension) within the statement
  • state the literary devices used by the author

 Evaluate your Introduction?

  1. Provide one -sentence comment on the topic you are writing.
  2. Provide an appropriate context of the narrative
  3. State the central idea.

 

Evaluate your conclusion-

  • Restate the most important point you have been making throughout the essay but in different words.
  • Make a real life connection (how is the discussion relevant in real life?)

 

Evaluate your body paragraphs-

  • Body Paragraph 1: key point 1 of his life experience that influenced the settingof the author’s writings
    1. Describea specific aspect of Whitman’s life experience;
    2. Inferwhat ideas or perspectives Whitman gains from the  experience ;
    3. Analyze how the attitude/perspective is reflected in his writing ( poem and /or journal);
    4. Evaluate how the examples from the journal or poem you have analyzed contribute (connect) to your central idea (So What).
  • Body Paragraph 2: key point 2 of his life experience that influenced the voiceof the author’s writings
    1. Describe a specific aspect of Whitman’s life experience;
    2. Inferwhat ideas or perspectives Whitman gains from the  experience ;
    3. Analyze how the attitude/perspective is reflected in his writing ( poem and /or journal);
    4. Evaluate how the examples from the journal or poem you have analyzed contribute (connect) to your central idea (So What).

 

  • Body Paragraph 3: key point 3 of his life experience that influenced the point of view/perspective of the author’s writings
    1. Describea specific aspect of Whitman’s life experience;
    2. Inferwhat ideas or perspectives Whitman gains from the  experience ;
    3. Analyze how the attitude/perspective is reflected in his writing ( poem and /or journal);
    4. Evaluate how the examples from the journal or poem you have analyzed contribute (connect) to your central idea (So What).

 

Assessment:  Students hand and in the literary analysis essay with the peer review feedback, rubric and the packet by the end of the period.

Homework: Write a page or two reflection on what you have learned from this unit of writing a literary analysis:

  • In what areas have you improved?
  • In what areas do you need to work harder to improve in the near future?
  • What are the top goals you are aiming to achieve for the next unit?
  • What have you learned about yourself as a learner through this unit?

 

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LCT Lesson on Falsetto

Objectives: Students will be able to compose a poem or song describing and reflecting their personal experience of a theme in the musical Falsetto through small group collaboration.

CCS

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.11-12.2
Determine two or more themes or central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to produce a complex account; provide an objective summary of the text.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.11-12.3
Analyze the impact of the author’s choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama (e.g., where a story is set, how the action is ordered, how the characters are introduced and developed).

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.11-12.3.B
Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, description, reflection, and multiple plot lines, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.W.11-12.3.D
Use precise words and phrases, telling details, and sensory language to convey a vivid picture of the experiences, events, setting, and/or characters.

Differentiation: Students can elicit ideas from the musical based on their personal experiences and connections they make individually. They are also given various options to create responses depending on their personal level of challenge and individual talent. Students can choose any genre they are familiar with to express their thoughts or feelings.

Grouping Rationale: Students will be grouped based on preparation as well as individual learning need, style, talents and personality to maximize their productivity.

Agenda

Do Now: Briefly describe one of the most poignant moments or scenes in the musical to you. What impact does it have on you? What could be the cause?

Mini Lesson with Guided Practice

Divide the class into groups of 3.

Step 1: As students share the scene and its impact (from Do Now) in a small group, ask: How does the scene connect to or illustrate a larger issue, i.e. family, prejudice, rites of passage, parent-children relationship, responsibility, acceptance or culture?

Step 2: In the scene you have described, what kind of theme is implied? What claim can you make based on the scene (i.e. Family is love not a social structure; or A real family always has many problems; Coming of age is not marked by a ritual but significant events in life.)

Step 3: Students independently or help each other generate a thematic statement based on the scene they have chosen to respond.

Group share and present.

Student Independent Practice

Students, individually or as a group, write a poem or vignette or a song on one of the themes embedded in the musical Falsetto.

For your creative work, consider using-

  • Narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, description, reflection, and multiple plot lines, to develop experiences or events
  • Precise words and phrases, telling details, and sensory language to convey a vivid picture of the experiences, events and/or setting

Small groups present their work to the class.

Quick Write to Reflect: How does a musical impact people? Consider Falsetto you have seen or the hit Broadway musical, Hamilton.

Homework: Complete and polish your creative work as your group response to the musical Falsetto. You may also opt to write an individual response. Due Monday 12/19/’16.

Evaluating Textual Analysis Sample Essay

Objectives: Students will be able to create an outline for a textual analysis essay in a  small group .

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.9-10.2:Determine a central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.9-10.5:Analyze in detail how an author’s ideas or claims are developed and refined by particular sentences, paragraphs, or larger portions of a text (e.g., a section or chapter).

Agenda

Do Now:  What is the central idea you have inferred from the excerpt from Dracula? Pair-share.

Mini Lesson

Creating an outline:

Introduction: state the central idea and name the strategy.

  • A central theme is the narrator’s feelings of despair or helplessness as the realization takes hold that he is being a prisoner in a desolate castle.
  • The write uses the tone, or his voice, to help develop the central idea.

Development

Body Paragraph 1: 

  • Topic sentence: The author uses  tone to help develop the central idea of despair in the story by describing the setting.
  • Context: A brief sugary that helps the reader to understand the evidence- The author describes the character’s surroundings as dull, dreary, grey, stoney and overall very depressing. 
  • Evidence ( that is an example of the writing strategy): Words such as ” stone stairs”, ” narrow darkness of the courtyard” and ” the window…was tall and deep, stone-mullioned and though weather-worn” reinforce this gloomy setting
  • Analysis: how does the evidence help the author develop his central idea? –When the author does this, he immediately implement the idea of depression or sadness into the piece of literature. The author also uses word choice to his advantage. The author is able to use his tone to convey the idea of despair through words and phrases like ” desperate straits” (line 13), ” prisoner” (line 1), ” I was helpless” (line 5 and ” I am, I know, wither being deceived like a baby by my own fears or ..”.( line12).
  • Making a connection back to the central idea: The author is able to convey the idea of desperation and despair through these gloomy quotes and create a tone, which also helps develops the central idea.

Body Paragraph 2:

  • Topic sentence
  • Context
  • Evidence ( that is an example of the writing strategy)
  • Analysis: how does the evidence help the author develop his central idea?
  • Making a connection

Conclusion: Repeat the central idea and how it reveals a universal truth.

Independent Practice:

Develop your own outline of the essay using one of your central ideas and writing strategies.

Reflect: What new insight have you gained through the practice of creating an outline for the essay?

Homework: Flesh out the essay based on the outline.

____________________________________________________

 

 

Objectives: Students will be able to evaluate and critique a sample textual analysis by using the NYS CC text analysis rubric in a small group setting.

CC Standards

CCS RI.2 and RI.3: The evidence-based analysis of the text, including the text-dependent questions and the focus of the claims, involve RI.2 and RI.3 (determine a central idea and analyze how it is conveyed and elaborated with details over the course of a text).

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.9-10.2:Determine a central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.9-10.5:Analyze in detail how an author’s ideas or claims are developed and refined by particular sentences, paragraphs, or larger portions of a text (e.g., a section or chapter).

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.9-10.1:Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions,building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

MATERIALS:

Agenda

Do Now: Take a moment to describe a challenge you have experienced in the process of writing an analysis essay.  Find the language in the rubric to help you describe it. Pair share.

Mini Lesson: Understanding the textual analysis task

Model read and analyze a text before students analyze the rest of the text in a small group.

Text-Analysis Response

Your Task:

Closely read the text provided on pages 18 and 19 and write a well-developed, text-based response of two to three paragraphs. In your response, identify a central idea in the text and analyze how the author’s use of one writing strategy (literary element or literary technique or rhetorical device) develops this central idea. Use strong and thorough evidence from the text to support your analysis. Do not simply summarize the text. You may use the margins to take notes as you read and scrap paper to plan your response.

Guidelines: Be sure to:

  • Identify a central idea in the text
  • Analyze how the author’s use of one writing strategy (literary element or literary technique or rhetorical device) develops this central idea. Examples include: characterization, conflict, denotation/connotation, metaphor, simile, irony, language use, point-of-view, setting, structure, symbolism, theme, tone, etc.
  • Use strong and thorough evidence from the text to support your analysis
  • Organize your ideas in a cohesive and coherent manner
  • Maintain a formal style of writing
  • Follow the conventions of standard written English

While following the reading, students will underline sentences or phrases that suggest a central idea  and identify one key writing strategy that help the author develops the idea.

Independent Practice

In a small group-

  • Students will share their central idea in a small group as well as the key strategy.
  • Evaluate the sample essay and understand why the essay is well-written analysis of the text.
  • Describe the strengths and create an outline for the essay.

Reflect: What new knowledge have I gained about writing a textual analysis?

Homework: Finish the outline for the sample essay.

 

_______________________________________________________

Objectives: Students will be able to evaluate and critique a sample textual analysis by using the NYS CC text analysis rubric in a small group setting.

CC Standards

CCS RI.2 and RI.3: The evidence-based analysis of the text, including the text-dependent questions and the focus of the claims, involve RI.2 and RI.3 (determine a central idea and analyze how it is conveyed and elaborated with details over the course of a text).

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.9-10.2:Determine a central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.9-10.5:Analyze in detail how an author’s ideas or claims are developed and refined by particular sentences, paragraphs, or larger portions of a text (e.g., a section or chapter).

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.9-10.1:Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions,building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

MATERIALS:

Agenda

Do Now:  Review the textual analysis rubric. Identify a specific area you do well and put a star next to it. Use the language from the rubric to give a detailed description. For example, you may say: I introduced a clear central idea( thesis) and provide analysis of it by using relevant evidence. Or you can write down a question: I wonder what it means…

Pair share.

Mini Lesson: Becoming familair with the criteria and language used in the rubric:

Review the criteria for evaluating a textual analysis-

  1. Content and Analysis:the extent to which the response conveys complex ideas and information clearly and accurately in order to respond to the task and support an analysis of the text.
  2. Command of Evidence: the extent to which the response presents evidence from the provided text to support analysis
  3. Coherence, Organization, and Style: the extent to which the response logically organizes complex ideas, concepts, and information using formal style and precise language
  4. Control of Conventions: the extent to which the response demonstrates command of conventions of standard English grammar, usage, capitalization, punctuation, and spelling

Discuss in the small group-

How do we distinguish essays at various levels ( 4, 3, 2 or 1) based on each category?

  • Circle the key words and phrase for each level. Make sure the phrases demosntrate the differneces.
  • share with each other.
  • Share in class your observations.

Independet practice

Evaluate each sample analysis by using the rubric.

  1. What level on a scale of 1-4 would you place the sample writing?
  2. Write a commentary on why you have given the writng the score you did by uisng the language from the rubric.

Your task:
1. Read the sample  essay
2. Write a commentary about the targeted areas in the essay
3. Use the language from the rubric
4. Provide an example
5. Write your comments on the poster paper
6. Present your comments  to the class

Reflect: what’s my new understanding of writing a text so analysis essay? Be specific.

Homework: Analyze the sample analysis essay using the rubric.

Rhetorical Appeals

The following information is cited from http://courses.durhamtech.edu/perkins/aris.html

On Rhetorical Appeals

A General Summary of Aristotle’s Appeals . . .

The goal of argumentative writing is to persuade your audience that your ideas are valid, or more valid than someone else’s. The Greek philosopher Aristotle divided the means of persuasion, appeals, into three categories–Ethos, Pathos, Logos.

Ethos (Credibility), or ethical appeal, means convincing by the character of the author. We tend to believe people whom we respect. One of the central problems of argumentation is to project an impression to the reader that you are someone worth listening to, in other words making yourself as author into an authority on the subject of the paper, as well as someone who is likable and worthy of respect.

Pathos (Emotional) means persuading by appealing to the reader’s emotions. We can look at texts ranging from classic essays to contemporary advertisements to see how pathos, emotional appeals, are used to persuade. Language choice affects the audience’s emotional response, and emotional appeal can effectively be used to enhance an argument.

Logos (Logical) means persuading by the use of reasoning. This will be the most important technique we will study, and Aristotle’s favorite. We’ll look at deductive and inductive reasoning, and discuss what makes an effective, persuasive reason to back up your claims. Giving reasons is the heart of argumentation, and cannot be emphasized enough. We’ll study the types of support you can use to substantiate your thesis, and look at some of the common logical fallacies, in order to avoid them in your writing.


Ethos, Pathos, and Logos.

Logos (Greek for ‘word’) refers to the internal consistency of the message–the clarity of the claim, the logic of its reasons, and the effectiveness of its supporting evidence. The impact of logos on an audience is sometimes called the argument’s logical appeal.

Ethos (Greek for ‘character’) refers to the trustworthiness or credibility of the writer or speaker. Ethos is often conveyed through tone and style of the message and through the way the writer or speaker refers to differing views. It can also be affected by the writer’s reputation as it exists independently from the message–his or her expertise in the field, his or her previous record or integrity, and so forth. The impact of ethos is often called the argument’s ‘ethical appeal’ or the ‘appeal from credibility.’

[P]athos (Greek for ‘suffering’ or ‘experience’) is often associated with emotional appeal. But a better equivalent might be ‘appeal to the audience’s sympathies and imagination.’ An appeal to pathos causes an audience not just to respond emotionally but to identify with the writer’s point of view–to feel what the writer feels. In this sense, pathos evokes a meaning implicit in the verb ‘to suffer’–to feel pain imaginatively…. Perhaps the most common way of conveying a pathetic appeal is through narrative or story, which can turn the abstractions of logic into something palpable and present. The values, beliefs, and understandings of the writer are implicit in the story and conveyed imaginatively to the reader. Pathos thus refers to both the emotional and the imaginative impact of the message on an audience, the power with which the writer’s message moves the audience to decision or action.

[The above text drawn verbatim from Ramage, John D. and John C. Bean. Writing Arguments. 4th Edition. Needham Heights, MA: Allyn & Bacon, 1998, 81-82.] http://www.u.arizona.edu/ic/polis/courses021/ENGL_102-78/EthosPathosLogos


Or The Shorthand Version:

Ethos: the source’s credibility, the speaker’s/author’s authorityLogos: the logic used to support a claim (induction and deduction); can also be the facts and statistics used to help support the argument.

Pathos: the emotional or motivational appeals; vivid language, emotional language and numerous sensory details.


The Art of Rhetoric:  Learning How to Use the Three Main Rhetorical Styles

Rhetoric (n) – the art of speaking or writing effectively (Webster’s Definition).

According to Aristotle, rhetoric is “the ability, in each particular case, to see the available means of persuasion.” He described three main forms of rhetoric: Ethos, Logos, and Pathos.

In order to be a more effective writer, you must understand these three terms. This site will help you understand their meanings and it will also show you how to make your writing more persuasive.

CUNY College Now College Courses for Free from 7/6-8/13/2015

Apply online ( https://baruch.az1.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_0ihoseClkZyC5Xn)

Parent Consent Form

Application Information

  • This application is open to students who will be a Junior or Senior in Fall 2015, attending NYC public high school.
  •  Priority will be given to Baruch College Now partner high school students.
  • Dates: July 6th, 2015- August 13th, 2015
  • Application Deadline: May 15, 2015 (Seats will fill quickly so don’t wait to apply)
  • Attendance Policy: No Absences will be allowed during the summer session. Attendance is Mandatory.
  • Students will be provided with a Metrocard and Lunch Voucher.
  • Incomplete applications will not be processed: Prospective participants MUST submit Transcript and/or PSAT/SAT scores.
Summer Course Descriptions 
 BUS 1000: Introduction to Business (Entrepreneurship Focus), 3 credits 
Students are given an overview of the study of business early in their college studies so that they can decide which field to major in and how the world of business works. The class is broken in four distinct parts – finance, marketing, management and an introductory section that covers ethics, global business and economics. Each of these parts covers the basic concepts found in one of the areas a student might select as a major. Each section also covers the current issues in today’s business world. These are the kinds of topics likely to be encountered in the current business press. Lectures are supplemented with real world case histories designed to highlight a specific topical, and often controversial, issue.
 BUS 1000 Afternoon Workshop: “The Business of Planning” Students will apply principles of the morning course to create a business plan. By the completion of the course students will be able to describe their business, including its products, its markets, the people involved and their financing needs. 
 BUS 1000: Introduction to Business (Marketing focus), 3 credits 
Students are given an overview of the study of business early in their college studies so that they can decide which field to major in and how the world of business works. The class is broken in four distinct parts – finance, marketing, management and an introductory section that covers ethics, global business and economics. Each of these parts covers the basic concepts found in one of the areas a student might select as a major. Each section also covers the current issues in today’s business world.
BUS 1000 Afternoon Workshop: “Cornering the Market” Students will apply principles of the morning course to study an industry in the “Inverted Pyramid” form and its top two competitors therein. By the completion of the course students will create a competitive strategy supported by a marketing message and creative integrated marketing campaign (ads, PR, sales and promotion).
 JRN 3050: Journalistic Writing, 3 credits 
This course is designed to teach students the fundamentals of journalism – reporting, researching, and writing news and feature articles, with a focus on fairness, accuracy, balance, and thoroughness. Students will cover stories on a range of topics, most of which will be culled from their own communities. Assignments are designed to give students an introduction to reporting on both individuals and institutions. Interviewing techniques, database research, and writing style will be developed during the semester.
JRN 3050 Afternoon Workshop: “Here and Now” Students will apply principles from the morning course to create an online newspaper. Students will learn about the role of the press in society, how the media has evolved and what are the rights and responsibilities of the audience. The workshop will include visits from Journalists and field trips to various media outlets.
 ANT 1001 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology 3 credits
An introduction to the historical and comparative study of what it means to be human, emphasizing both the shared conditions and the unique characteristics of the world’s peoples. Included among the topics covered are questions of human origins and races, the nature of culture, relations between language and culture, and cross-cultural approaches to economics, politics, religion, gender, and social organization.

The ANT 1001 afternoon workshop will focus on the Changing New York; students will research and explore the changes occurring in several neighborhoods throughout New York City; this includes the Harlem, Williamsburg and the South Bronx. Students along with the Instructor will tour the changing neighborhoods; culminating into several group research projects that will present on how these neighborhoods have changed over the past decade.

HED 1911 Critical Health Issues 3 credits
A study of current critical health issues and the individual’s role in society with major emphasis upon the areas of human sexuality, drug abuse, environmental pollution, physical fitness, and diet.

The HED 1911 afternoon workshop will focus on Researching Critical Health Issues discussed in the college credit course. Students will be placed into groups that will explore the various topics that include human sexuality, drug abuse, environmental pollution, physical fitness, and diet. The afternoon workshop will allow students to work with the instructor on learning about library research and how to write a research paper and corresponding group project.